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Wednesday, February 27, 2008
NJ Training and Schools Section
NJLawman.com

Planning out schools for your officers or yourself?  If so, the NJLawman.com Training and Schools section will be your first stop.

Once again, we've assembled every class from every New Jersey police academy into one easy-to-use resource broken down by month for the entire 2008 calendar year.

Whether you in in charge of the training for your agency or are just looking for a class or two to build your resume, this section should be added to your favorite places.

Below is a sample for March, 2008.  Click here to reach the main training page.

3 Title 2C Update Essex County, NJ
3 Vehicle Theft & Staged Accidents Union County, NJ
3-5 Criminal Justice Information Systems (CJIS) Bergen County, NJ
3-5 Proactive Police Supervision Bergen County, NJ
3-6 9-1-1 Training/Emergency Medical Dispatch Bergen County, NJ
3-7 DWI Detection/Standardized Field Sobriety Testing Course Cape May, NJ
3-7 Advanced Traffic Crash Reconstruction with WIN Crash Gloucester County, NJ
3-7 Introduction to Basic Drug Intelligence Analysis Fort Indiantown Gap, PA
3-7 Spanish for Law Enforcement Officers Morris County, NJ
3-7 Basic Bloodstain Analysis Course Mercer County, NJ
3-7 Basic Telecommunicator Certification I Union County, NJ
3-14 Supervision School Gloucester County, NJ
3-14 Basic SWAT Cape May, NJ
3-14 Vehicle Crash Investigations I Essex County, NJ
3-14 Accident Investigation II (Crash II) Passaic County, NJ
3-14 Crash Investigations I Camden County, NJ
3-4/28 Auxiliary Police Class Bergen County, NJ
3-5/16 NJ Police K-9 Training - Specialty Dog Training Camden County, NJ

 

Thursday, February 21, 2008
New Shotgun
NJLawman.com

It doesn't get much more lethal than this.  Check out the vide below:

 

 

Tuesday, January 15, 2008
Street Survival
NJLawman.com

The premiere law enforcement seminar is coming to Atlantic City, New Jersey next week. 

Calibre Press' Street Survival will be held on January 22 and 23 at Harrah's Atlantic City. Street Survival is one of the finest law enforcement seminars ever assembled. 

For more information, click here.

 

Wednesday, December 26, 2007
Volunteers in Police Service
NJLawman.com

Recently, a site visitor sent us an email about this one.

There is a website, http://www.policevolunteers.org which is assembling a collection of information, resources, and actual organizations involved with law enforcement-related volunteer work.

The website serves as a gateway to information for law enforcement agencies and citizens interested in law enforcement volunteer programs.

The VIPS Program offers the following resources:

  • An online directory of existing law enforcement volunteer programs that potential volunteers can search to connect with a program in their community.
  • Volunteer Programs: Enhancing Public Safety by Leveraging Resources - a resource guide to assist in the implementation or enhancement of an agency volunteer program.
  • An online library of sample documents and forms.
  • A model policy.
  • Regional training and networking opportunities.
  • Technical assistance.
  • VIPS Info, a monthly electronic newsletter
  • VIPS in Focus publication series.
  • Educational videos.
  • A discussion group for registered VIPS Programs to share information and ideas.

 

Monday, November 12, 2007
Ticket Quotas
NJLawman.com

Every so often we get emails requesting the New Jersey law which "prohibits ticket quotas," so occasionally we post it on the site. 

Pay particular attention to section b.  Contrary to what may think, statistical performance - as long as it is not the sole criteria - may be used for "promotion, demotion, dismissal, or the earning of any benefit provided by the department or force. Any such arrests or citations, and their ultimate dispositions, may be considered in evaluating the overall performance of a law enforcement officer."

40A:14-181.2. Police ticket quota for motor vehicle violations prohibited; permitted use of statistics.
a. A State, county or municipal police department or force engaged in the enforcement of Title 39 of the Revised Statutes or any local ordinance adopted pursuant to this title shall not establish any quota for arrests or citations. The department or force may, however, collect, analyze and apply information concerning the number of arrests and citations in order to ensure that a particular officer or group of officers does not violate any applicable legal obligation.

b. The department or force shall not use the number of arrests or citations issued by a law enforcement officer as the sole criterion for promotion, demotion, dismissal, or the earning of any benefit provided by the department or force. Any such arrests or citations, and their ultimate dispositions, may be considered in evaluating the overall performance of a law enforcement officer.

 

Friday, October 5, 2007
Cheese Heroin
NJLawman.com

Originating some time in 2005, the concoction known as "cheese" has been gaining popularity, especially in the southwestern part of the country.

Below is an excerpt from a USA Today article explaining further:

A new heroin-laced powder known as "cheese" is popping up in middle and high schools in Texas, where dozens of youths have been caught with the drug, federal and local officials say.

So far the problem has been focused on schools in Dallas, where police first reported kids snorting the mixture of ground-up cold medicines and heroin at the start of this school year. However, the Drug Enforcement Administration, which calls the addictive concoction "starter heroin," is concerned enough about the drug's appearance in Dallas that it has alerted agents nationwide to watch for it.

"It's an emerging problem," DEA spokesman Steve Robertson says. "It's something we're tracking to see if we can spread the word before it becomes a huge problem."

Police in Dallas have logged 78 incidents involving cheese in 11 middle and high schools, says Jeremy Liebbe, an investigator with the Dallas Independent School District Police Department.

Cheese is a tan powder made mostly from acetaminophen and diphenhydramine HCL — the ingredients in Tylenol PM — with a little heroin mixed in. Liebbe says samples confiscated in Dallas have been up to 8% heroin. The drugs are crushed together and typically folded into notebook paper. A quarter-gram sells for $5, Liebbe says, and a single hit usually sells for $2.

 

Monday, August 20, 2007
Speed Traps
NJLawman.com

It's called the Speed Trap Exchange, and it purports to be a nationwide database for cataloging speed traps from municipalities around the country.

The site also has some activist articles encouraging visitors to organize against speed traps. 

As far as logging speed traps, they do have some of ours.  Click here to see if any of your favorite haunts are on the list.

 

Sunday, July 29, 2007
Internet Hoaxes
NJLawman.com

Like you, we get many emails each week reporting a wide array of situations ranging from stories of companies overcharging soldiers in Iraq for bottled water to tips on using a cell phone during an emergency.

Most of these are Internet hoaxes.

Pictured to the right is one of the more famous Internet hoaxes.  The email says it is from the parents of abducted child Penny Brown.  It further asks the recipient to keep forwarding it as part of an Amber Alert.  (See the hoax explained)

The best technique for determining whether an email is a hoax is to go to the website www.Snopes.com.  

Snopes has cataloged and investigated thousands of rumors and other Internet communications.  For each, they explain the origins and in some cases they even verify that the situation is real.

Either way, it is a nice tool for investigating what is true and what is not.

Click here to visit the Snopes.com website.

 

 

Sunday, July 8, 2007
New Product
NJLawman.com

The photo on the right depicts an officer using a new product called the "Cool Cop." 

We actually did an article on it to describe it in greater detail. 

Click here to take a look.

 

 

 

 

 

Monday, July 2, 2007
National Night Out
NJLawman.com

Police departments across the nation are gearing up for this year's National Night Out festivities which are scheduled for Tuesday, August 7, 2007.

For more information on this year's National Night Out, click here.

 

Sunday, July 1, 2007
Fireworks - What to Charge
NJLawman.com

We post this every year and get complaints when we forget.  For New Jersey officers, July brings an annual question when making arrests for fireworks: "What do I charge them with?"

Chapter 21 covers explosives and fireworks. You'll find a plethora of statutes in this chapter covering everything from smoking in a facility that manufacturers fireworks to rules regulating the public display of fireworks. The statute most relevant to the line officer will be 21:3-2. Sale, Possession, or Use of, Fireworks which reads as follows:

    It shall be unlawful for any person to offer for sale, expose for sale, sell, possess or use, or explode any blank cartridge, toy pistol, toy cannon, toy cane or toy gun in which explosives are used; the type of balloon which requires fire underneath to propel the same; firecrackers; torpedoes; skyrockets, Roman candles, bombs, sparklers or other fireworks of like construction, or any fireworks containing any explosive or inflammable compound or any tablets or other device commonly used and sold as fireworks containing nitrates, chlorates, oxalates, sulphides of lead, barium, antimony, arsenic, mercury, nitroglycerine, phosphorus or any compound containing any of the same or other explosives, or any substance or combination of substances, or article prepared for the purpose of producing a visible or an audible effect by combustion, explosion, deflagration or detonation, other than aviation and railroad signal light flares, except (a) that it shall be lawful for any person to offer for sale, expose for sale, sell, possess or use, or explode any toy pistol, toy cane, toy gun, or other device in which paper or plastic caps containing .25 grain or less of explosive compound per cap are used, providing they are so constructed that the hand cannot come in contact with the cap when in place for use, and toy pistol paper or plastic caps which contain less than .20 grain of explosive mixture per cap and (b) as in this chapter further provided.

The statute also contains exceptions and other important information, so be sure to read the actual law and consult your only agencies rules before filing any charges.  

 

Sunday, June 10, 2007
FBI Ten Most Wanted
NJLawman.com

The Federal Bureau of Investigation's Ten Most Wanted FugitivesDo you know who the current top ten most wanted are?

Time for a refresher.  Click here to take a look.

 

Monday, May 28, 2007
Shoot, Don't Shoot
NJLawman.com

Many of our firearms programs have dwindled into nothing more than qualifying twice a year.  Throw in two more dates for agencies with rifles.

A company called Law Enforcement Targets can help put some actual training back into your firearms program. 

LET offers a nice line of paper targets with depicting various scenarios. 

Besides their selection of paper targets, they offer a line of "overlays."  These allow range instructors to change the threat of the paper target between shoots.

LET also has a selection of other targets and range gear.

To visit their website, click here.

 

Sunday, May 6, 2007
Who is Daniel Faulkner
NJLawman.com

We republish this piece about once a year.  In light of recent events, now is a good time to remind everyone about Daniel Faulkner.

Years ago there was a Philadelphia Police Officer named Daniel Faulkner.  He was killed in 1981 by a radical named Mumia Abu-Jamal.  Without going into all the details, Mumia was sentenced to death.  He has crowned himself the poster boy for political oppression and racism. He's obtained supporters from around the globe and from all walks of life.  Actress Susan Sarandon, the owners of Ben & Jerry's Ice cream, and Ed Asner are among those within his ranks.  A massive effort complete with letter campaigns, billboards, rallies, and marches have all been held for this animal.

Members of the Philadelphia Police Department, Maureen Faulkner (Daniel's wife), friends, and family have fought this crusade every step of the way.  This officer died more than twenty-five years ago, and his supporters (many from the next generation of cop) still fight as hard now as they did when it first happened.  They have done an amazing job.  As a neighboring state, New Jersey law enforcement should educate themselves as to the details of this case.  If ever needed, we should be on buses in great numbers to Philadelphia to support our brother.  To learn more about this case, visit the Daniel Faulkner website.  

I have read a lot about this topic from all different sources.  I believe 100% that Mumia did it and deserves the death penalty.  Don't go by what we say though.  Visit the above site, look for the opposing arguments, and make your own decision.  Either way, major kudos to those who have battled for Danny Faulkner.  

 

Friday, May 4, 2007
2007 Drug Identification Guide
007 Drug Identification Guide
NJLawman.com

The StreetDrugs 2007 Drug ID Guide is now shipping.  It contains eighty pages of High Resolution images of illegal drugs.  

It can be purchased for $6.50 by clicking here.

Or, the StreetDrugs 2006 Drug ID Guide, last year's book, can be purchased for just $4.00 per copy by clicking here.

 

 

Monday, April 16, 2007
New Product
NJLawman.com

Just about every street survival-type or officer safety class will touch upon the importance of proper cuffing and ensuring that the arrestee does not get out of his handcuffs.  There is a relatively new product on the market that can help. 

Dubbed the Zak Tool Handcuff Cover, it's simply a velcro cover for "pickable" parts of the handcuffs.  It is easily stored, lightweight, and inexpensive.

It goes for about eight bucks and can be found here.

 

Sunday, March 25, 2007
Google Earth
NJLawman.com

This has got to be one of the greatest, free tools out there.

It's called Google Earth, and it should be in the bag of tools of every law enforcement administrator, emergency management coordinator, and homeland security official.

It's a bit hard to describe, and there is nothing really like it.

Basically, you download and install the free software from Google.  When you have it up and running, you will have satellite imagery of the entire planet.  You can take a look at the island you once visited on vacation, plot a search pattern for a missing child, or use it to set up a perimeter for a future search warrant.

It has been out for several years now, but many officers still have not heard about it.  For those of you who already use it, take a look anyway as there have been newer versions released.

To access the Google page with more information and the download, click here.

 

Monday, March 19, 2007
Pursuit and Shootout Audio Transmission
NJLawman.com

The audio clip below is from a rolling pursuit and shootout which occurred in New York City.   It would be an excellent piece to use for training with dispatchers and/or officers. 

 

 

Sunday, March 4, 2007
Protocol for Wearing Black Bands
NJLawman.com

Occasionally we receive inquiries regarding the protocol for wearing black mourning bands over uniform badges.  We found the following on the Officer Down Memorial Page:

A common request we receive at the ODMP is if there is a protocol for the wearing of mourning bands following a line of duty death. There seems to be no universal protocol for the wearing of mourning bands, and oftentimes it is left up to each individual agency to determine under what circumstances and for how long to wear them.

We have developed the following suggested guidelines that can be adopted into your agency's general orders for proper protocol of wearing mourning bands:

Within your agency ~ from the time of death until midnight on the 14th day after the death

Within your region ~ from the time of death until midnight on the day of the funeral

Funeral attendee ~ out-of-region officers while attending funeral

National Peace Officers Memorial Day (May 15th) ~ from 0001 hours until 2359 hours

 

Sunday, February 25, 2007
Hogan's Alley
NJLawman.com

The FBI has a miniature city which they use for street survival and combat training.  It’s called Hogan’s Alley.

From the FBI website:

New Agents are taught at [Hogan’s Alley] in the areas of surveillance, arrest procedures, and tactical street survival techniques. The new agents are then taken through real to life training exercises such as a bank robbery, a day and night time surveillance, a kidnapping, and an assault on a federal officer. New Agents are also exposed to complaint and armed and dangerous arrest scenarios. Paint Gun exercises are also utilized in order to test the New Agents' tactical skills.

Hogan's Alley Complex is a unique method of allowing New Agents to apply principles taught in other areas at the FBI Academy including firearms, academics, physical training, and legal training in order to successfully resolve the above described practical exercises at PAU. During exercises students are provided with the tools similar to those in the field such as bureau vehicles, radios, and electronic surveillance equipment.

 

Sunday, February 11, 2007
NJ Training and Schools Section
NJLawman.com

The 2007 Training and Schools section of the NJLawman.com website is growing each week.  In it, we compile a master list of law enforcement schools and training opportunities available in the New Jersey area.  Click here to reach the main training page.

Below is a small sample from February 2007:

1

PowerPoint for Law Enforcement - Intermediate Course

Union County, NJ

2

Gang Culture Awareness

Essex County, NJ

2

Weingarten Rights, Garrity Rights, and Civil Liability

Somerset County, NJ

2

Effectively Dealing with the Mentally and Emotionally Ill

Camden County, NJ

2

Access for Law Enforcement: Intermediate Course

Union County, NJ

5

Title 2C Update

Essex County, NJ

5

Introduction to Word

Bergen County, NJ

5

Officers in Crisis

Morris County, NJ

5-9

Method of Instruction

Gloucester County, NJ

6

Word 2000 Intermediate

Bergen County, NJ

6

Search and Seizure Case Law Review

Essex County, NJ

6-7

Incident Command 100 and 200

Bergen County, NJ

7

Planning For Your Retirement

Burlington County, NJ

7

Introduction to Excel

Bergen County, NJ

7

Spotlight on Human Trafficking

Bergen County, NJ

7

Methamphetamine Safety & Awareness for First Responders

Cape May, NJ

7

Right to Counsel – Miranda Warnings

Essex County, NJ

7

Microsoft FrontPage Basic Course

Union County, NJ

7-9

Spanish for Law Enforcement Officer

Morris County, NJ

7-15

Method of Instruction

Monmouth County, NJ

 

Sunday, February 4, 2007
New Magazine for Law Enforcement Recruits
NJLawman.com

Police Magazine is known to just about everyone who has at least some time on the job.   Well, the publisher of Police Magazine has come out with a second publication targeted directly to the officers of tomorrow. 

Police Recruit is now available.  This magazine contains articles geared to newly hired officers and seems rather interesting. 

It is being distributed free of charge to “law enforcement academies, criminal justice colleges, continuing education institutions and police supply stores.”

For more information, stop by the Police Magazine website.

 

Sunday, January 28, 2007
2006 Line of Duty Death Summary
NJLawman.com

The preliminary figures for last year’s line of duty deaths have been posted. There are several entities that track this information ranging from the FBI to National Law Enforcement Memorial. The actual stats will vary as each group uses its own criteria when compiling the numbers.

The information below is from the Officer Down Memorial Page.

Total Line of Duty Deaths: 142

Aircraft accident: 3
Assault: 2
Automobile accident: 35
Bomb: 1
Duty related illness: 2
Gunfire: 48
Gunfire (Accidental): 3
Heart attack: 10
Motorcycle accident: 7
Stabbed: 1
Struck by vehicle: 11
Vehicle pursuit: 3
Vehicular assault: 16

By Month:
January: 13
February: 17
March: 10
April: 8
May: 13
June: 8
July: 5
August: 15
September: 15
October: 15
November: 12
December: 11

Average tour:
`0 years, 9 months

Average age:
37

By Gender:
Female: 5
Male: 137

Three New Jersey officers are included in the numbers. They are as follows:

Senior Corrections Officer Wayne Clark
New Jersey Department of Corrections, NJ
EOW: Tuesday, January 10, 2006
Cause of Death: Automobile accident

Police Officer Matthew Melchionda
Watchung Police Department, NJ
EOW: Wednesday, March 8, 2006
Cause of Death: Automobile accident

Detective Kieran T. Shields
Orange Police Department, NJ
EOW: Monday, August 7, 2006
Cause of Death: Gunfire

 

 

Friday, January 26, 2007
2007 Calendar Cops Issue
NJLawman.com

If half naked police officers is your thing, the 2007 edition of Calendar Cops is out and available for purchase. 

Click here to take a look.

 

Monday, December 5, 2006
Interesting Video
NJLawman.com

The following video footage is a three-minute-piece of a rally held in San Francisco presumably over the summer.  Different parts are spliced together, and it's interesting to see how San Fran PD (which did a very good job) handles the crowd.

Click here to view the video.

 

Thursday, October 12, 2006
Language Translation Website

NJLawman.com

There is a website we found that allows you to enter text and have it translated to English or from English to several different languages.  Right now the site includes English, Spanish, French, Italian, German, Dutch, Portuguese, Norwegian, and Chinese.  It is an excellent tool for law enforcement, but be careful as the translations are not always exact.  The site is www.Freetranslation.com.  

A link to this site has been permanently added to our Investigative Resources page.

 

Monday, September 5, 2006
When is it Time to Call for Backup
NJLawman.com

Well, it's certainly not after you are already in a fight.

Ninety-five percent of the time, the suspect tells you when you should be calling for additional units.  Maybe not in so many words, but he signals it.

It is when you walk up to the car and he is belligerent.  It is when he begins to get loud.  It is when he tells you to take your hands off of him.  It is when you notice him clinching his fists.  It is on the MV stop when he begins questioning you.  It is when you observe furtive movement.  It is when you notice he and his partner whispering.  It is when the car doesn't immediately pull over.  It is when he doesn't immediately follow your commands. 

We could go on, but you get the point.  The call for an extra unit should go out at the first sign of trouble, not the last sign.

 

Sunday, August 27, 2006
Great Website Resource

NJLawman.com

First, we have never actually gone through the process with either of these sites, so we cannot vouch either way for their quality.  If anyone has input, please email us.

We came across a couple of interesting websites which house information on lost and unclaimed monies.

The first is called MissingMoney.com.  The site allows you to do a search by name for lost, forgotten and misplaced

  • Bank accounts and safe deposit box contents
  • Stocks, mutual funds, bonds, and dividends
  • Uncashed checks and wages
  • Insurance policies, CD's, trust funds
  • Utility deposits, escrow accounts

To visit that site, click here.

For New Jersey officers there is also a site run by the Division of Taxation which also allows you to do a search by name.  Click here to visit that one.

 

Sunday, August 20, 2006
New Jersey Homeland Security Website

NJLawman.com

Not sure how many of us are aware of this website.

Launched back in 2003, New Jersey has its own website devoted to homeland security issues in New Jersey.

The site is very informative and contains some great information for in-service training as well as presentations to the public.

Click here to take a look.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Night OutMonday, July 31, 2006
National Night Out
NJLawman.com

Police departments across the nation are gearing up for this year's National Night Out festivities which are scheduled for August 1st.

For more information on this year's National Night Out, click here.

 

 

Reloading.jpg

Sunday, July 17, 2006
Reloading

NJLawman.com

Great training video here.

How fast are you at reloading your weapon?  Take a look at this guy, and then answer the question.  This would be a great video to show during patrol briefings.

Click here to see the video

 

Sunday, July 2, 2006
Hiding Spots

NJLawman.com

These eight containers all have one thing in common: they are fakes.

These and many others like them are readily available for purchase from both online and brick-and-mortar companies.  They are designed as secret safes for citizens to protect their valuables, but they've also been used to secret contraband.

To view the entire collection, copy and paste the following into your browser:

http://sneakysafes.com/index.html

 

Sunday, May 21, 2006
Cell Phone Guns

NJLawman.com

Last week it was reported that the NYPD issued an internal memo regarding cell phone guns. 

While they have not yet surfaced it the U.S., officers should be aware that they do exist and they do function.

According to the International Association of Chiefs of Police,

The deadly phones come apart in the middle to reveal a four-chamber compartment for .22 caliber bullets, which can be shot out of a protruding fake antenna. "These would be lethal at 10 meters (yards)," said Michel Lavaud, head of a local police brigade.

 

Monday, May 15, 2006
3 Types of Reloading

NJLawman.com

Administrative reload, Opportunity reload, Combat reload.

An administrative reload is what you do to your your weapon at the beginning of your shift.

Now we get to the two important ones.

An opportunity reload is when you are in a combat situation and realize that you have used a good portion of your magazine.  You have cover and are temporarily safe.  Instead of waiting for the magazine to run dry, you take the opportunity to reload.  Since you are temporarily safe, don't disregard the partial magazine.  Stuff it in a pocket in case you need the rounds later. Opportunity reloads need to be taught and practiced more.

A combat reload is when you must reload during combat.  When your on a range day, don't pass up the opportunity to test your ability to combat reload.  Put a real scenario in your head.  Dump the empty magazine and get the new one in immediately.  How fast can you do it? 

Practice both of these.

 

Sunday, May 7, 2006
Ready.Gov
NJLawman.com

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security offers a website with some very valuable information.  It is called Ready.Gov. 

One of the primary mandates of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security is to educate the public, on a continuing basis, about how to be prepared in case of a national emergency – including a possible terrorist attack.  This website has cataloged a wealth of information and is worth the visit.  Click here to visit.

 

Sunday, April 30, 2006
Plenty of Help Out There

NJLawman.com

We try and revisit this at least once a year.

Suicide is the leading cause of officer deaths each year.  Some estimates suggest that suicide takes five times more officers than line of duty deaths.

There is no reason for this anymore as a lot of help is now available.

Most certainly, someone going through a difficult spell is reading this right now.  Below, we have posted contact information for resources specially designed for cops. 

If you are having difficulty or know of an officer who is, please make use of these resources.

 

Sunday, April 30, 2006
Who the Secret Service Protects

NJLawman.com

Interesting read from the website of the United States Secret Service:

After the assassination of President William McKinley in 1901, Congress directed the Secret Service to protect the President of the United States. Protection remains the primary mission of the United States Secret Service.

Today, the Secret Service is authorized by law to protect:

  • the President, the Vice President, (or other individuals next in order of succession to the Office of the President), the President-elect and Vice President-elect;
  • the immediate families of the above individuals;
  • former Presidents, their spouses for their lifetimes, except when the spouse re-marries. In 1997, Congressional legislation became effective limiting Secret Service protection to former Presidents for a period of not more than 10 years from the date the former President leaves office.
  • children of former presidents until age 16;
  • visiting heads of foreign states or governments and their spouses traveling with them, other distinguished foreign visitors to the United States, and official representatives of the United States performing special missions abroad;
  • major Presidential and Vice Presidential candidates, and their spouses within 120 days of a general Presidential election.

 

Sunday, April 23, 2006
First Aid Calls - Strokes

NJLawman.com

This one will benefit you whether you're on a call or at a family function.

Strokes are difficult calls for first responders as we are limited in what we can do besides comforting the victim, providing oxygen and expediting emergency transport.

However, there is one crucial thing we can do: Find out exactly when the stroke occurred.

There is a medication that can be given to certain stroke patients, which, is some cases, can significantly minimize the effects of the stroke.  It is called TPA or in medical terms t-PA.

However, this medication generally must be given within three hours of the actual stroke.

There has been great success with this medication.  Click here for more information.

 

Sunday, April 16, 2006
Motorcycle Club Websites

NJLawman.com

The Internet just keeps growing.  Even some of the larger motorcycle "clubs" have their own websites.  And, they're very interesting too.

Here are a couple we found that are by or about some of the more well known clubs:

 

Sunday, April 9, 2006
Know Thy Enemy!

NJLawman.com

Here's another example of time well spent.

The site is called CopsSuck.com.  It's your garden variety anti-law enforcement website which has  everything you have come to expect.

Their message board has an "Ask the Cops" section.  I can't imagine what cops would want to man that disaster and field those questions.

Anyway, just paste the following into your browser to take a look.

http://www.copssuck.net/

 

Monday, April 3, 2006
Interesting Website
NJLawman.com

We found this site which you should add to your favorite places on the web.

It's called Family Watchdog.

On their main page, just type in an address, and a map will come up showing the locations of sex offenders who live in the area.  You can then click on the locations and see offender information with a photo.

It looks like they are only showing higher tier offenders, but, still, it's a handy tool.

We'll be adding it to our Investigative Resources page in case you lose the address.

http://www.familywatchdog.us/

 

Sunday, March 26, 2006
IACP Oath of Honor
NJLawman.com

Several years back the International Association of Chiefs of Police launched an excellent program called the Law Enforcement Oath of Honor. 

Simply, officers volunteer to reconfirm their pledge to an honorable career.  To accomplish this, they take the oath of office provided by IACP.

It is a very big deal to agencies that have adopted the program.  Below is an excerpt from the program's description:

It is envisioned that the Oath of Honor would be used in a number of applications, including spoken as a form of voluntary reaffirmation at assembled public and internal gatherings of law enforcement officers (public ceremonies, promotional events, law enforcement conferences, etc.); placed on signs and conspicuously displayed throughout law enforcement facilities; printed on the back of business cards and other types of agency materials; incorporated at every opportunity in policies, procedures and training materials; referred to by administrators in conversation and correspondence; and referenced in both positive and negative personnel actions.   

To learn more, visit the IACP Website.

 

Sunday, March 19, 2006
Defeating Police Tactics

NJLawman.com

It's always good to know what your opponent is thinking.

We found a page on a website which discusses how to defeat police tactics.  The article is specifically geared toward defeating the tactics used during a large-scale unrest. 

This exact piece is posted on at least sixteen different websites, so it's safe to assume it has been read by many of those who like to stir the pot at such protests.

It's an interesting read.  Click here to view the article.

 

Sunday, March 12, 2006
Police Week 2006
NJLawman.com

Police Week 2006 is fast approaching.  Attending it something that every officer should do at least once in his or her career.

For information on this year's plants, visit our Police Week 2006 page.

 

Sunday, March 12, 2006
The Police Unity Tour

NJLawman.com

When the Police Unity Tour was first founded in 1997, it was only supposed to be a one time event to raise money for the National Law Enforcement Officer's Memorial, which relies upon private donations. The Tour has since continued to grow each and every year. The Tour started with eighteen people with a donation of $18000 to the memorial. Over 700 members presented the memorial with a donation of $750,000 in 2005.

Each year they hold a bicycle ride from their respective locations to Washington D.C. just in time for the beginning of Police Week.

For more information on the Police Unity Tour, visit their website.

 

Sunday, February 12, 2006
Interesting Shotgun Facts
NJLawman.com

Most of us who are not hunters or gun enthusiasts have limited knowledge and experience with shotguns.  Here are a couple of interesting facts:

  • OO Buck Rounds generally consists of 8 or 9 .33 caliber projectiles
  • While police shotgun spread varies, a very general rule is that the spread will be 1 inch per yard
  • Shotguns are excellent combat weapons for up to 20 to 25 yards depending on the weapon and rounds used
  • Rifled Slugs are .69 caliber rounds

 

Sunday, January 29, 2006
The Drink Wheel

NJLawman.com

Here is an interesting little tool which will supposedly calculate blood alcohol content.

It is called the Drink Wheel.  By entering alcohol type, amount, gender and weight, the tool will approximate the BAC. 

Now, of course, there are many variables (some not included in this tool) in determining blood alcohol content, but, still, it's a neat online device.  Click here to take a look.

 

Sunday, January 22, 2006
Wanted Posters
NJLawman.com

This one is neat.

We found a website that specializes in offering reproductions of wild west wanted posters.  From Jessie James to Pancho Villa, they have them all. 

The posters only go for about $6.00 which is quite reasonable, but cannot vouch for their quality as we've never seen one up close.

Still, for only six bucks it's worth a shot to those interested.

Click here to visit the website.

 

Sunday, January 15, 2006
ARRESTED!
NJLawman.com

Wanted Bulletin Cancelled!  Kincey has been arrested and taken into custody.  Click here for more.

 

Sunday, January 15, 2006
Excellent Information on Gangs

NJLawman.com

The East Orange Police Department website, run by Lt. Gene DiGiacomo, has a page on gangs that is an excellent read for all officers.

It contains both basic basic and very detailed information on some of the larger gangs that exist today.

To visit the website, click here.

 

Tuesday, January 3, 2006
The Worst Shooting Position

NJLawman.com

While techniques differ widely throughout the law enforcement community, there are some things for which we should all be on the same page.  The photo to the right is clearly one of those things.

The website ForceScience.com calls this the Hollywood Highguard position.  Simply, it should never be used except when making movies.

This, additional shooting positions, and a wealth of other information related to law enforcement can be found on the website ForceScience.com.

Range Instructors and other officers involved in force training will find this site especially useful.

 

Tuesday, December 27, 2005
Officer Alert

NJLawman.com

Pictured to the right is a ring that is also capable of firing pepper spray into the eyes of an unsuspecting person.

It is designed as a self-defense tool for the public, but officers should be cautioned that such a device exists. 

They go for about $24.00 and can be purchased right online.

For more information, visit the following web address.  

http://www.personal-selfdefense-online.com/pepper-spray-ring.htm

 

Sunday, December 18, 2005
Natural Voices
NJLawman.com

This is just very cool.

From a page on this AT&T website, you can enter text which is translated to speech and spoken back to you using human-sounding synthetic speech.

It gives you a choice of different accents, voices, and even languages.

While there may be some uses for the job, you'll probably have more fun leaving constructed  messages in other people's voice mail.  http://www.naturalvoices.att.com/demos/

 

Sunday, December 11, 2005
The Honor Legion
NJLawman.com

The Honor Legion. 

You have probably heard of them.  You might have been given one of their courtesy cards.  The Honor Legion is a law enforcement fraternal organization which is involved in many good deeds and programs. 

Following is a letter from Jim Homwey, a senior member describing the Honor Legion:

I'm Jim Homwey, 2nd Vice President of the Honor Legion.  For those of you who are not familiar with the honor legion, it is a police fraternal organization of the "finest of the finest" law enforcement officers. Any person who is a bona fide active and paid member of any regular law enforcement agency shall be eligible to apply for active membership in this association subject to the restrictions and limitations hereinafter provided.  Elected and appointed officials are not eligible. Membership is available to any member who has risked his or her life to save a human life or whose life has been in imminent risk of danger from an armed adversary.  Final determinations shall be at the discretion of the executive board of the Honor Legion.  Be advised that there are three distinctly different new member applications:

1.  Active members with NJ jurisdiction
2.  Active members without NJ jurisdiction
3.  Retired members

See new membership information and other New Jersey Honor Legion information at our website NJHL.com or contact me at 2NDVP@njhl.COM.

Fraternally yours,

Jim Homwey, Jr.
2nd Vice President of NJ Honor Legion

 

Sunday, December 4, 2005
New Concept in Traffic Enforcement
NJLawman.com

Pictured to the right is the 3D Patrol Decoy, a recently launched product made by Florida-based Safe Highway Corporation.

3-D Patrol is a police decoy vehicle designed as an inexpensive alternative to having an actual patrol car on the side of the road as a deterrent to speeding. The vehicle is equipped with radar and a speed threshold control that allows it to turn on flashing lights in the presence of an oncoming speeding vehicle.

The unit is situated on a trailer which can be towed from location to location.

For more information and photos, stop by their website at http://www.3dpatrol.com.

 

Sunday, December 4, 2005
Women in Law Enforcement
NJLawman.com

SameShield.com is a website devoted to women in law enforcement and the issues they face.

It's an interesting site which catalogs news, issues, line of duty deaths and other information relevant to female law officers.

The link is http://www.sameshield.com.  

 

Sunday, November 27, 2005
It's not Just Guns!
NJLawman.com

To date, 130 law enforcement officers have fallen in the line of duty.  Of that number, 42 died from motor vehicle-related incidents.  This is excluding 13 more deaths involving vehicles in assault-by-auto incidents.

It's not enough to just practice good tactics.  Too, too many of us die from simple car crashes.

Wear your seatbelt, wear your vest (proven time and time again to protect officers in accidents), and don't let emotion dictate your driving.  We all get juiced up when dispatched to certain calls, but we have to drive very, very carefully.

It's better to get there a few seconds later than not get there at all.

 

Sunday, November 20, 2005
Wake Up Call for Veterans
NJLawman.com

What do you think is the average age of officers who die in the line of duty? 

Many would guess it to be in the early or late twenties since officers are generally at the most proactive point of their careers at those ages.  The answer will probably surprise you. 

Year to date, the average age for officers who die in the line of duty is thirty-nine.  This is not just some statistical aberration either.  The average age in 2004 was thirty-nine.  The average age in 2003 was thirty-seven.  In 2002, it was thirty-eight.  It was 39 in 2000; 38 in 1999; 39 in 1998; 39 in 1997; 37 in 199; and 39 in 1995. 

While there has been no study or research as to the reason for this, officers generally become more complacent as they get further into their career which could be a factor.  

 

Sunday, November 6, 2005
Internet Investigation Resource
NJLawman.com

You are conducting an investigation pertaining to a website, and you need to see what was on the site a month or a year ago.  Well, we found a resource that can do just that.  It is called the Wayback Machine.  

Simply, this site takes snapshots of websites and stores them.  Generally, it takes several snapshots each month and seems to house them indefinitely.  

Click here to check it out.  Enter NJLawman.com to see how this site appeared.  Oh, this site was first launched in 2002, so disregard the options for 2001.  Also, we will be putting a link to this site on our Investigative Resources page so you know where to find it should you ever need it.  

 

Sunday, October 30, 2005
Med-Evac
NJLawman.com

As most know, NorthStar runs the med-evac program in northern New Jersey.  Their website contains some interesting information for first responders who have occasion to be present or participate in a med-evac situation.

Below are some of tips provided by their site:

  • The landing zone (LZ) should be a minimum of 110 feet by 110 feet, level, firm, dry and free of debris.
  • Secure the perimeter from pedestrians or vehicles.
  • Keep personnel and fire apparatus 100 feet from perimeter of LZ.
  • Mark the corners of the LZ with bright colored cones, lights or public safety vehicles.
  • When using flares, care in their use and/or anchoring is highly recommended.
  • NEVER SHINE LIGHTS at NorthSTAR, they may blind the pilots.
  • If the pilots feel the LZ you selected is unsuitable, an alternate should be selected.
  • Shield your eyes or wear safety glasses while NorthSTAR lands or takes-off.
  • DO NOT APPROACH NorthSTAR while the blades are moving.
  • ALWAYS APPROACH NorthSTAR from the side, in full view of the crew and then only with the escort of a crew member.
  • NEVER APPROACH NorthSTAR from the BACK, approach from the side with caution.
  • Keep arms and IV's at or below shoulder height.
  • Secure all loose objects and personal items, e.g. hats, stethoscopes.
  • No smoking within 100 feet of the aircraft.

To learn more, stop by their website.

 

 

Monday, October 17, 2005
New Police Training Section for NJ Officers
NJLawman.com

We have just added an entire section to the NJLawman.com website which will catalog all New Jersey police schools and classes held throughout the state. 

Click here for more information.

 

Sunday, October 16, 2005
Crime Scene Investigations Website
NJLawman.com

We came across a rather interesting website. Based out of California, this site offers a host of articles and information on crime scene investigation.  We found some excellent articles on murder scenes, developing latent footwear impressions, human remains and computer forensics.  

This site will be especially valuable to newer officers who have not yet had any advanced training.  Still, we found some of the tips in the articles to be new and quite handy.  We recommend that all take a look.

Click here to visit.  

 

Power Lines
Monday, October 10, 2005
By NJLawman.com

One of the most dangerous jobs in law enforcement is anything having to do with live power lines.  Zero to minimal training against high voltage will always lose.

To see some videos of what can go wrong, visit a site we found which seems to be the NJLawman.com of the linemen world.  Use the links on the right side of the page to see the videos at Powerlinemen.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Police Dogs
Sunday, October 2, 2005

By NJLawman.com

One of our site readers sent us this one.

The link below will take you to a site with a great video of police dogs in action.  It appears to be from Germany.

Click here to take a look.

 

Stolen Car Stats
Sunday, October 2, 2005

By NJLawman.com

We found some interesting information on the National Insurance Crime Board website.

"In 2003, 1,260,471 motor vehicles were reported stolen at an estimated value of over $8 billion. With recovery rates hovering near the 65% mark, that leaves a tremendous number of vehicles that are either cut up for parts, exported to other countries, or reappear as clones, the latest trend in an ever-expanding list of fraud schemes."

The top ten stolen vehicles for New Jersey in 2003 are as follows:

  1. 2000 Honda Civic
  2. 1989 Toyota Camry
  3. 1991 Honda Accord
  4. 1994 Chevrolet Full Size C/K 1500 Pickup
  5. 1994 Dodge Caravan
  6. 1997 Ford F150 Series
  7. 1986 Toyota Pickup
  8. 1995 Acura Integra
  9. 1987 Nissan Sentra
  10. 1986 Oldsmobile Cutlass

 

Grants
Sunday, September 25, 2005

By NJLawman.com

Law enforcement agencies are always looking for grant money.  Much of what use to be available has dried up as more resources and funds are detoured toward homeland security.  Still, there is a good amount of money out there if you can find it.

One resource we found is called OnlineGrants.us.  The site has some good information on research, writing and landing grants.  Also, make sure to check out the page on corporate grants.  Many don't realize how much private money is available.

 

Hidden Weapons
Sunday, September 25, 2005

By NJLawman.com

One of our frequent readers, Walt, sent us this one.

It is a webpage on the Orange County Shields' website which catalogs a large assortment of hidden weapons and concealment devices

There is some great information here.  We will also be filing this on the Police Tactics section of this website.

 

Stare Decisis
Sunday, September 18, 2005

By NJLawman.com

If you followed any of the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court Nominee John Roberts, you heard the term stare decisis (pronounced stair-ee duh-seye-sis) used several times throughout the debate.

Stare Decisis is Latin for "to stand by that which is decided" or "let the decision stand."

Simply, it is the foundation for how courts must follow previously decided, judge-issued law.

 

Excellent School - Free Tuition, Free Housing, Free Meals
Sunday, September 11, 2005

By NJLawman.com

It's back.

The Northeast Counterdrug Training Center (NCTC) with locations in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin is a Federally funded training program which offers many classes and programs for law enforcement officers.

Last year it's funding was lost, but it is now back in operation.

Interview and interrogation, search warrant execution, polygraph instructor, and police executive management are just some of the many courses offered.

And again, it's free for law enforcement agencies.

To visit the main page of their website, click here.

 

When a Search Ends
Sunday, September 11, 2005

By NJLawman.com

With everything we have learned from those who have fallen before us, it is inconceivable that an officer can be hurt or killed due to a previous poor search.

The search of a suspect ends when all possible areas have been searched, not when something is found.  Too often, when contraband is located, the search ends or it is done half ass because the searching officer thinks that he or she has found the suspect's hiding spot or finding a "mother load" distracts us from properly completing the search.

The search of a suspect ends when all possible areas have been searched, not when something is found.

 

Monday, September 5, 2005

Missing/Unidentified Persons Investigations Resource

This is an interesting one sent to us by one of our visitors, Joyce.

There is a website viewable to the general public named The Doe Network which catalogs missing persons and unidentified persons cases.

They post pictures, location and other related information.

If you have any old cases, this resource might be worth a shot.

 

Monday, September 5, 2005

Bank Robbery Resource

This website primarily serves Pennsylvania and West Virginia, but it is worth a look for anyone involved in a bank robbery investigation.

Simply, it catalogs photos taken from security cameras during bank robberies.  Click here to take a look.

 

Sunday, August 7, 2005

Excellent Resource

Once in a while there comes a need to learn about a certain country whether it be to further an investigation, to become acquainted with the customs of another, or just out of curiosity.  

There is a branch of the CIA website called the World Factbook.  It is the place to begin.  

Maps, terrain, climate, population, literacy, background, currency, and geographic coordinates are just some of the many areas explained.  We have added it to our Investigative Resources page so you can always find it.  Click here to visit the site.

 

Sunday, August 7, 2005

MV Stops at Night

When effecting nighttime motor vehicle stops, upon approaching the stopped vehicle, start making a habit of always asking the driver to turn on the interior light. 

This serves several purposes.  First, it illuminates the vehicle interior for you observation.  Second, should the driver come out of the car for any reason, he or she will have reduced night vision which always occurs when someone goes from a well-lit environment to a dark environment.  

This works especially well when stopping cars with tinted windows.

In some states, there are now laws requiring motorists to obey this request.

 

Sunday, July 31, 2005

Rules for the Flag

There are many rules which govern how the United States flag is suppose to be flown.  Some will even surprise you.

We found a website which explains all of them.  Click here to take a look.

 

Sunday, July 24, 2005

Recording the Police

Last year we reported on a Chiefs of Police meeting where one of the presenters detailed a scheme where certain people are purposely trying to have encounters with law enforcement officers.

These people are wearing hidden microphones and, in one case, a hidden video camera to record the actions of the officer. This has apparently happened in several areas of the state, and at least one of the incidents was depicted on a local television program. It has also been reported that people are using cellular telephones and palm pilots, many of which have recording capabilities, to record encounters with law enforcement.   

We post this not because we think that officers are doing something wrong but because this may escalate into these persons trying to prod and provoke officers.  

 

Sunday, July 17, 2005

Latex Gloves

Too often, officers who are wearing latex gloves contaminate their own equipment, uniform, and supplies.

For example, an officer responds to a first aid call where the victim has an arm laceration.

The primary officer puts on a pair of latex gloves, gathers some bandages from the first aid kit, and begins treating the injury.

Of course, some blood gets on the gloves.

The officer needs more bandages and, while still wearing the gloves, which have been contaminated, again opens the first aid kit and grabs some more items.  Then, for his report, the officer takes out his pen and notebook while still wearing the gloves to get the victim's information for the report.

The ambulance arrives, and first aid personnel take over.  They ask the officer if he could help them with some light.  The officer, while still wearing the contaminated gloves, grabs his flashlight and illuminates the victim.

We could go on, but you get the point.  In this scenario, this officer has contaminated the first aid kit, his pen, his notebook and his flashlight which are all items he will be using later with his bare hands.

Once you have touched a victim, your gloves have been contaminated.  You should touch nothing else while still wearing the same gloves.

 

 

Monday, July 11, 2005

Do You Know Any of These Faces?

Terrorist BOLO - Be On the Lookout for These IndividualsPictured to the right are the faces of seven persons whom the FBI would like to know better.

"Last year, FBI Director Mueller and Attorney General Ashcroft held a press conference to call renewed attention to 7 individuals believed to pose a real and present danger to U.S. interests around the world--perhaps most especially this summer and fall, a time of high profile public events that may well serve as a lightening rod to terrorist attacks."

Click here for additional information.

 

Monday, July 4, 2005

Patient Conditions

Every day we hear a news report on some incident where the victim's condition is described as one of several terms.  However, most of us do not know how the medical field even uses these terms. 

We took a look at several sources.  The terms come from the American Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).  Here's how they go:

Undetermined - Patient is awaiting physician and/or assessment.
Good - Vital signs are stable and within normal limits. Patient is conscious and comfortable. Indicators are excellent.
Fair - Vital signs are stable and within normal limits. Patient is conscious, but may be uncomfortable. Indicators are favorable.
Serious - Vital signs may be unstable and not within normal limits. Patient is acutely ill. Indicators are questionable.
Critical - Vital signs are unstable and not within normal limits. Patient may be unconscious. Indicators are unfavorable.

 

Sunday, June 27, 2005

Countdown to Retirement

For those of you who have begun the countdown to your retirement date, we found a pretty neat tool.

By entering the exact date of your retirement, this tool will give you the exact countdown of days, hours, minutes and seconds until you get the gold watch.

To view this tool, click here.

 

Sunday, June 27, 2005

What is MS-13

In recent months, there has been much media coverage of the street gang MS-13.  Unfortunately, most officers have little or no knowledge of MS-13.

This gang originates from El Salvador.  Its name is derived from La Mara, a street in El Salvador, and the Salvatrucha guerillas who fought in the El Salvador civil war.  MS-13 appeared on the radar in Los Angeles in the 1980's, and has since spread to many states throughout the country.

Make no mistake: This is a very, very deadly gang, and targeting law enforcement officers is not beyond them.

There is an excellent article in POLICE Magazine which is well worth the read for officers wanting to learn more about MS-13.  To view the article, click here.

 

Sunday, June 19, 2005

Inside Cops

Recently, VH1 aired a program which went behind the scenes of the television show COPS.  Below is an excerpt from their site: 

VH1 Goes Inside: COPS is a celebration of one of the longest running prime-time shows on television. In its seventeenth season, COPS continues to entertain and inform its viewers, giving them a first-hand account of the daily lives of police officers across the country. VH1 Goes Inside: COPS features clips of memorable moments from the show, dating back to the pilot episode in 1989. VH1 Goes Inside: COPS will also include interviews with the show's producers and crew, as well as the police officers who have helped make the show such a success.

It is very interesting and worth the watch.

For listings of when the program will air again, click here.

 

Sunday, June 19, 2005

Resources for Grants

With more and more funds being steered toward homeland security and away from day-to-day policing, finding grants is more important than ever before.

OnlineGrants.us has assembled a nice collection of information on writing grants, researching grants, and locating grants.

Click here to take a look.

 

Sunday, June 12, 2005

Hidden Cuff Key

We were recently sent this picture from one of our site visitors.

Simply, it is a handcuff key secreted in a hidden compartment located on the rear of the sneaker.  

This poses a number of dangers, and all officers should be aware of this.

The exact brand of sneaker was not mentioned and really is irrelevant since new models come out routinely.

You might want to post this in your squad room.

 

 

 

Sunday, June 12, 2005

New Product

This one is for gun enthusiasts and those concerned about home protect alike.

The product is called the Pillow Pal Holster Holder.

Simply, it serves as a holster for handgun holsters.   It is also a great tool for holding television remote controls, flashlights, glasses, cell phones, etc.

Clearly, this is not a product for homes with children in the house or in situations where someone besides the gun owner could access the weapon.

This should also serve as a bulletin for officers assigned to entry teams in the event that this product winds up in the hands of an ill-intended person.

Click here to visit the site.

 

 

Sunday, June 5, 2005

CIA MemorialCIA Memorial Wall dedicated to CIA officers who lost their lives in the service of their country.

On the north wall of the Original Headquarters Building lobby, to the right as you enter, is a memorial wall that was commissioned by the CIA Fine Arts Commission in May 1973 and sculpted by Harold Vogel in July 1974.

With the simple inscription "IN HONOR OF THOSE MEMBERS OF THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE SERVICE OF THEIR COUNTRY," this wall of 83 stars stands as a silent, simple memorial to those CIA officers who made the ultimate sacrifice.

The glass-encased Book of Honor below the stars lists the 48 names of officers which can be revealed; while the names of the remaining 35 officers must remain secret, even in death. Framed by the American and the Central Intelligence Agency flags, this memorial immortalizes these anonymous few who served and sacrificed in silence.

 

Sunday, June 5, 2005

Excellent Tool

Zak Tool No. 57 Handcuff Key with Window Punch - Click for larger imageThe Scenario: Motor vehicle accident with entrapment, black smoke coming from the engine and under the car with small flames beginning to emerge. 

Car windows can take numerous strikes from PR-24's and ASP's.  In a situation such as this, your options are limited and time is slipping away.

The tool pictured to the left is both a handcuff key and a window punch.  It will break safety glass instantly with a spring loaded, specially designed hammer.  This is a highly recommended tool for anyone on the road.

They can be purchased at Copquest.com for under eight bucks.

 

Monday, May 31, 2005

Tactics - Fill in the Gaps

Your radio crackles.  One of your fellow officers is going out with a suspicious subject.  You respond to assist.  Where should you position yourself?

Often, the second officer to arrive approaches and stands right next to the first officer.  Minutes later a third officer responds.  He or she then stands next to the first two.  Additional officers respond, and the shoulder to shoulder action continues.

Too often the above scenario is the case.  

When a second officer arrives, he or she take a position directly behind the suspect.  This way, the most obvious path of flight is now blocked.  If a third officer responds, he or she should take a position to the left or the right of the suspect.  The other two officer should re-position themselves, so they are forming a triangle around the suspect.  With each responding officer filling in an empty gap, the chances of flight significantly reduce. 

When responding to back up a fellow officer, FILL IN THE GAP

 

Monday, May 31, 2005

Presidential Order of Succession

Okay, this is not really law enforcement-related, but it is interesting nonetheless.

In 1947 the rules for the current Presidential Order of Succession were established.  Below is the list of who would take over as President in the event that a sitting President should be unable to hold office:

  • The Vice President Richard Cheney

  • Speaker of the House John Dennis Hastert

  • President pro tempore of the Senate1 Ted Stevens

  • Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice

  • Secretary of the Treasury John Snow

  • Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld

  • Attorney General Alberto Gonzales

  • Secretary of the Interior Gale A. Norton

  • Secretary of Agriculture Mike Johanns

  • Secretary of Commerce Carlos Gutierrez2

  • Secretary of Labor Elaine Chao3

  • Secretary of Health and Human Services Mike Leavitt

  • Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Alphonso Jackson

  • Secretary of Transportation Norman Yoshio Mineta

  • Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman

  • Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings

  • Secretary of Veterans Affairs Jim Nicholson

  • Secretary of Homeland Security4 Michael Chertoff

 

Monday, May 23, 2005

Law Enforcement Salaries

When contract time arrives FOP and PBA locals always find themselves in a position of needing information.  The contract terms and salaries of other agencies usually tops the list.

There is a website we found which catalogs such information from agencies around the nation.  They also provide other services including a financial analysis of your municipality. 

The site is called PolicePay.net.  Click here to take a look.

 

Monday, May 23, 2005

United States Constitution

Always an interesting read.  We just added a page to our site which contains the entire United States Constitution and the Amendments.  To view, click on the United States Constitution.

 

Sunday, May 15, 2005

Preparing for the Promotional Exam

Preparing for a promotional exam is by far the largest academic endeavor most officers will ever experience.  It requires months of studying.  The results will often reflect who invested the most hours in preparation. 

We found a statistic that is quite interesting and relevant.  It has to do with memory.  After all, retention is what preparation is about. 

According to the June, 2004 FBI Bulletin, our retention level is most dependent on how the material is presented to us.  Below is a list based upon a scientific study sited in the bulletin.

Our Retention Levels

  • 10 percent of what we read
  • 20 percent of what we hear
  • 30 percent of what we see
  • 40 percent of what we see and hear
  • 60 percent of what we discuss with others
  • 70 percent of what we experience personally
  • 80 percent of what we discover and solve individually or in groups
  • 95 percent of what we teach to someone else

 

Sunday, May 15, 2005

Spotting the Spotlight

Where should the spotlight be pointed when making a vehicle stop?

Well, there are several schools of thought here.  Some say always on the rear view mirror.  Others say it should be pointed on the side view mirror, and others say it should be used to light up the passenger compartment.

How about basing it on the circumstances.

If you are stopping a car to arrest the front seat passenger who is suspected of having a gun, you may want to aim the spot light on the passenger side mirror.  If it is just a stop of a vehicle occupied once, the driver side mirror is fine.  If upon stopping a vehicle you notice five heads inside, it is advisable to light up the passenger compartment.

The spotlight is an excellent tool for both giving the officer extra illumination and for temporarily taking out the night vision of a vehicle occupant or occupants.  Use it based on the circumstances of the stop you are making,

Perhaps the best method is using it based on this situation you are facing.

 

Sunday, May 1, 2005

Emergency Lights or Flashers

When making motor vehicle stops, just about all officers activate their entire light bar to catch the attention of the motorist.  When the vehicle stops, the light bar remains fully activated for the duration of the stop to warn approaching traffic and protect the officer.

But, very often when officers pull up behind disabled vehicles, they only activate the overhead flashers and not the entire light bar. 

This doesn't really make any sense.  The danger to the officer from rear approaching traffic is just as great when behind a disabled vehicle as it is when behind a stopped vehicle.

Emergency lights should be used whenever stopped behind a vehicle on a highway or busy roadway.

 

Sunday, May 1, 2005

Excellent Range Exercise

Range instructors and avid shooters are always looking for exercises to improve all aspects of weapons proficiency.  Here is one.

From the ten-yard-line, shoot as follows:

1.  Fire one round, drop and replace the magazine,

2.  Fire two rounds, drop and replace the magazine,

3.  Fire three rounds.

This exercise is excellent for building reloading skills.  The goal should be to get shooters to the point where they can complete all three phases in under ten seconds with all of the shots landing within the given target.  Once there, the distance can be moved back to the fifteen-yard-line.

 

Monday, April 18, 2005

Selecting a Duty Weapon

In the January issue of the FBI Bulletin, an excellent article on selecting a duty handgun was published. 

The article covers everything from magazine capacity to caliber to materials and finish.

To view the article, click here.

 

Monday, April 18, 2005

The FBI National Academy

The FBI National Academy is the most prestigious law enforcement training that any officer can add to a resume.  The program is offered four times each year, and each program lasts for approximately 16 weeks.

Participation is by invitation only, though a nomination process. Participants are drawn from every state in the union, from U.S. territories, and from over 150 foreign nations.

Below are the requirements as listed by the Academy for officers who may be nominated:

  • A regular full-time officer of a duly-constituted law enforcement agency of a municipality, county, or state, having at least five years of substantially continuous such experience

  • At least 25 years of age

  • In excellent physical condition, capable of sustained strenuous exertion and regular participation in the use of firearms, physical training, and defensive tactics, which will be confirmed by a thorough physical examination (submitted when requested by FBI) by a medical doctor of nominee's choice and at nominee's expense

  • Is of excellent character and enjoys a reputation for professional integrity

  • Exhibits an interest in law enforcement as a public service; a seriousness of purpose, qualities of leadership; and enjoys the confidence and respect of fellow officers

  • Has a high school diploma or high school equivalency certificate

  • Agrees to remain in law enforcement a minimum of three years after graduation from the FBI National Academy

 

Sunday, April 10, 2005

Police / Law Enforcement Magazines

For those who enjoy magazines, there are some great ones covering the law enforcement industry.  Below are some of the better publications, and all may be obtained through Amazon.

 

Sunday, April 10, 2005

Line of Duty Deaths So Far This Year

As of this date, thirty-five lawmen and women have lost their lives this year.  Below is a breakdown as provided on the Officer Down Memorial Page website:

Automobile accident 7
Drowned 1
Gunfire 15
Gunfire (Accidental) 1
Heart attack 5
Stabbed 1
Struck by vehicle 2
Vehicular assault 3

Total Line of Duty Deaths

35

By Month:
January: 9
February: 9
March: 14
April: 3

By State:
California: 2
Florida: 2
Georgia: 3
Illinois: 2
Indiana: 2
Kansas: 2
Kentucky: 1
Louisiana: 1
Michigan: 1
Mississippi: 2
Missouri: 3
New Jersey: 1
North Carolina: 1
Ohio: 1
Pennsylvania: 2
South Carolina: 2
Tennessee: 1
Texas: 2
U.S. Government: 2
Virginia: 1
Washington: 1

Average age: 37

By Gender:
Female: 1
Male: 34

 

Monday, April 4, 2005

Using Gloves

Latex gloves should be used on every first aid call, period. 

There are numerous diseases and conditions that can be spread through skin contact.  To just name a few, scabies, head lice, herpes, impetigo, conjunctivitis, or "pink eye," respiratory syncytial virus, shingles, and Ebola.

There have been incidents from around the country of officers taking home diseases and spreading them to family members.  Corrections officers are just as vulnerable due to the closed-in nature of the facilities.  Police officers deal with the same people and also go to first aid calls for people who are already sick.

Keep them in your hat, your pocket, or a pouch, and use them for every first aid call.

 

Monday, April 4, 2005

The Second Amendment

We always talk about it, but when was the last time you actually read it?  Below is the text from the Second Amendment:

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

 

Sunday, March 27, 2005

CPR - What Happens Without It

Below is an interesting chart we obtained from CPR-Pro.com.  It outlines what happens to a first aid patient once breathing stops.

0 Minutes –

Breathing stops – Heart will soon stop beating

0-4 Minutes –

Clinical Death

4-6 Minutes –

Brain Damage Possible

4+ Minutes –

Biological Death

6-10 Minutes –

Brain Damage Likely

10 + Minutes –

Brain Damage

 

Sunday, March 27, 2005

Good Off Duty Tool

We were always taught that if we carry an off duty weapon, we should also be carrying handcuffs.  However, not enough of us follow this wise suggestion.

Recently, we've seen an increase in the number of officers carrying thumb cuffs. They are small, light, and can easily and comfortably be stored in a pocket or bag.

Generally, thumb cuffs go for less than twenty dollars.

 

Sunday, March 20, 2005

Your Tax Bracket

Yes, we had this one posted before, but as April 15th approaches, it is relevant.

You see the deductions every two weeks on your pay stub, but do you know your tax bracket.  While not relevant to law enforcement, we thought that you might find this interesting.

Tax Brackets—2004 Taxable Income

Joint return Single taxpayer Rate
$0–$14,000 $0–$7,000 10.0%
14,000–56,800 7,000–28,400 15.0
56,800–114,650 28,400–68,800 25.0
114,650 –174,700 68,800–143,500 28.0
174,700–311,950 143,500–311,950 33.0
311,950 and up 311,950 and up 35.0

Source: Tax Foundation.

 

Sunday, March 20, 2005

Night Sights

With police firing ranges in some states slowly becoming extinct, many of us don't even do real night firing anymore.  Instead, most agencies are using welder's goggles to simulate low-light conditions.  One of the many drawbacks of this technique is that the shooter cannot even see or practice with the night sights on the weapon.

When we say "night sight," we are referring to those expensive night sights that your agency purchased a while back for your service weapons.  Do you know if your weapon's night sights even  still work?

A common misperception is that the Tritium Night Sights are actually a liquid which is applied to weapon sights to later dry and be used forever.

The reality is that these sights are actually tiny glass vials of gas which are carefully attached to the front and rear sights.  These sights do have a shelf life (which differs depending upon the manufacturer), and these sights can fall off.  

If your agency doesn't do realistic low-light firing, you probably do not even know if your sights still work.  Bottom line, Tritium Sights must be checked before every shift.  

 

 

Sunday, March 13, 2005

Interesting Reading

We don't normally do this, but there is a very entertaining message board based off the website Copwatch.com.  It is filled with postings from every anti-police crusader.

If you want to drive them bananas, leave a post telling them you're on the job and what you think of their conspiracy theories.  Try and be somewhat  nice.

A word of caution though.  Don't go if you easily get offended.  They really dislike law enforcement.  Click here to pay a visit.

 

Sunday, February 27, 2005

Clothing for Cops

Previously, we've covered clothing designed for bad guys.  Recently, we found a web site that offers clothing for cops.

BULLET 50 clothing built and designed by street cops for street cops. Functional and fashionable on-duty/off-duty clothing. No more fanny packs, cuff cases or bulky holsters to carry around.

The Flagship product for BULLET 50 is the denim jean from the “STREET CRIME LINE”. These denim jeans will carry most all-essential gear needed (pistol, ammo mags, flashlight asp, handcuffs, pepper spray, cell phone etc.) for on duty/off duty operations.

Very interesting.  Click here to take a look.

 

Sunday, February 27, 2005

G A N G S

Most states have been experiencing an increase in gang activity.  With the lack of training and resources in some agencies, officers are forced to fend for themselves to learn about this growing problem.

The web site GangsorUs.com has become the online authority for information on these criminal organizations.  From hand signals to tattoos to intelligence, this site is worth a look.  Click here.

 

Sunday, February 20,  2005

NJLawman.com

As the NJLawman.com site has grown, we've noticed some of our pages receiving less traffic.  Below are four which are all excellent resources.  Take a look.

 

Sunday, February 20,  2005

Cop 2 Cop Program

Whether your walking a pod in Riverfront State Prison or stopping cars on 195, stress is the common denominator for law enforcement.  Suicide is the leading cause of death for those in this profession. In fact, suicide will claim anywhere from three to five times more of us than line of duty deaths.  

New Jersey has a unique program which recognizes the stress of the job and reaches out to those of us who need help.  By calling 1-866-COP-2COP you can speak with a specially trained active or retired law enforcement officer.  Only current or retired officers are permitted to participate as call takers.  

This line receives many calls each week.  If you or someone you know is going through a difficult time, give them a call.  Click here for their website. 

 

Sunday, February 13, 2005

A Very Special Officer

Officer Jason Schechterle
before the accident

Officer Jason Schechterle
 after the accident

Jason Schechterle was an road officer for the Phoenix, Arizona Police Department.  On March 26, 2001 at 11:21 p.m. his life was changed forever.

Jason was badly burned when his FORD CROWN VICTORIA POLICE INTERCEPTOR exploded in flames after being hit from behind by a taxi Cab. The collision happened while Jason was responding to a call.

The Phoenix Fire Department was also in route to the same call and witnessed the collision. The Fire Department did a heroic job saving Officer Schechterle's life, freeing him from the burning vehicle. Jason received severe burns to his face, arms and upper body. He was transported to the Maricopa County Hospital Burn Unit, where he was treated until July 31, 2001 when he was finally transferred to the Good Samaritan Rehabilitation Unit.

Instead of giving up, Jason has become an advocate for the rest of us.  He is a true, modern-day inspiration.

Take a look at his web site and read more about him.  You will be in awe of this class act named Jason Schechterle.

 

Sunday, February 13, 2005

Supreme Court Cases You Should Know

In the December, 2004 issue of the FBI bulletin, they published a great piece on nine United States Supreme Court cases that affect most in law enforcement.

Click here to take a look.

 

Sunday, February 13, 2005

NJ Pension Phone Line Updated to December 31

The automated phone line which provides pension loan information has been updated to December 31, 2004. If you are in the New Jersey Police & Fire Pension System, call 1-609-777-1777. By using this automated phone line you can learn the following:   

  • Loan, Purchase, and Withdrawal Information
  • General Account Information
  • Retirement Information
  • Health Benefit Information
  • Deferred Compensation Information
  • (NJ Police & Fire Pension Website)

 

Sunday, February 6, 2005

Police Week 2005

While it has the same celebratory sound to it as "Bike Week," Police Week is no party.

Each year, the week containing May 15th is designated as Police Week.  It is a time where new names are added to the only wall in D.C. that will never be finished.

Click here for this year's 2005 Police Week itinerary.

 

Sunday, February 6, 2005

2005 Police Vehicles

Click here to take a look at some of the different police vehicles available in 2005.

 

Tuesday, February 1, 2005

First Aid Calls - Strokes

Strokes are difficult calls for first responders as we are limited in what we can do besides comforting the victim, providing oxygen and expediting emergency transport.

However, there is one crucial thing we can do: Find out exactly when the stroke occurred.

There is a medication that can be given to certain stroke patients, which, is some cases, can significantly minimize the effects of the stroke.  It is called TPA or in medical terms t-PA.

However, this medication generally must be given within three hours of the actual stroke.

There has been great success with this medication.  Click here for more information.

 

Tuesday, February 1, 2005

The Police Unity Tour

The Police Unity Tour was founded in 1997 by Officer Patrick Montuore of the Florham Park, NJ Police Department.  Pat wanted to help raise money for the National Law Enforcement Officer's Memorial by gathering together several law enforcement officers and riding their police mountain bikes from New Jersey to the site of the Memorial in Washington D.C. 

Since then it has grown into an annual event that has delivered over a million dollars to the Memorial Fund, making it the largest private and/or corporate sponsor of the Memorial!

For more information and to visit the site, click here.

 

Tuesday, January 25, 2005

Video of Heroic NJSP Rescue

The State Trooper Fraternal Organization is to the rank and file of the New Jersey State Police what the PBA and FOP are to municipal, county, and other state officers. 

On their website they now have the video from an actual rescue of persons trapped in a burning car.  You will get chills watching this.  Click here to visit their site.

 

Sunday, January 16, 2005

September 11th Tribute

William Prentice is a police officer with the Port Authority Police Department. 

Recently, he put together a personal-page website.  On the site there is a very, very touching tribute video about September 11th.  While we receive numerous emails with tributes, we have never seen this one before.  Click here to take a look.

Also, check out the rest of this site as it is light and entertaining.  And, please sign his guestbook.

 

Sunday, January 16, 2005

Cops Trying New Things

Officers from the Irvington and Parsippany Police Departments in New Jersey have launched a new effort to combat urban and gang violence.

"Police Against Gang Empowerment (PAGE) will engage youth in urban communities through the establishment of a structured environment with a solid foundation composed of police-youth mentorship programs. Volunteers of PAGE will solicit parental and community involvement to raise the stand for continued success, obtaining the end-results of behavioral change, scholastic achievement, and the creation of a safe haven for gang resistance."

We wanted to put more light on this program.  Instead of just dwelling on what hasn't worked, officers like Detective Monique Smith and Officer Quaasim Austin are trying new things.  To read more about this program, click here.

NJLawman.com applauds the efforts of these and the other officers involved.

 

Sunday, January 10, 2005

Federal Inmate Locator

This one was sent to us by one of our readers.  Thanks Manny.

The United States Bureau of Prisons has an Inmate Locator feature on their website.  The database contains Federal prisoners from 1982 to present.  A search may be conducted by the inmate's Register number, DCDC number, FBI number, INS number, or by using the inmate's first and last name.  We will also add this resources to our Investigative Resources page. 

To visit the website, click here.

 

Sunday, January 10, 2005

Terrorism

Abu Sayyaf Group.  Islamic Jihad.  Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades.  Hezbollah.  Hamas.  FARC.  ETA.  Who are these groups, and what do they want? 

While the chances of a line officer having direct dealings with any international terrorist group are very slim, professional law officers today should be at least acquainted with the various terrorist organizations.  

Last year's  deadly attacks in Madrid, Spain were originally speculated to have been committed by ETA, a group little known to most Americans until now.   ETA stands for Euskadi ta Askatasuna, which means “Basque Fatherland and Liberty” in the Basque language.  The  Basques are a distinct Christian group that want their independence from Spain.  They live in a mountainous region between Spain and France.

We found an excellent website that covers terrorism and its practitioners from A to Z.   It is called TerrorismAnswers.com.  We strongly recommend you visit and educate yourself a bit.  

 

Thursday, January 6, 2004

Iraq Wants You

In the mood for some serious adventure?  How about a one-year term of service in Baghdad as a police officer.  

Active police officers are still being recruited to serve in Iraq for a year.  Their job will be to help the Iraqi citizens organize effective civilian law enforcement, judicial, and correctional agencies.  The minimum term of service is one year, and officers would be armed and working in plain clothes positions.  The pay structure has been revised from the last time we covered this.

Pay structure is as follows:
Police Advisors: $120,632.00

All lodging, meals, and transportation, as well as logistical, technical and administrative support necessary to accomplish the advisor's mission is provided at no cost to the officer.

There are also available positions in East Timor and Kosovo.  Click here to visit their website. 

 

Thursday, January 6, 2004

Quick Look at The Amber Plan

"What is this Amber Plan that I've been hearing so much about?" you may be asking yourself.  Here it is:

The AMBER Plan is a partnership between law-enforcement and broadcasters to activate an urgent bulletin for serious child-abduction cases. Broadcasters use the Emergency Alert System to air a description of the missing child and abductor. It is the same concept used during weather emergencies. The goal of the AMBER Alert is to instantly galvanize the entire community to assist in locating the child.

The AMBER Plan was created in 1996 as a legacy to 9-year-old Amber Hagerman, a little girl who was kidnapped and brutally murdered Arlington, Texas. The tragedy outraged the entire community. Residents contacted radio stations in the Dallas area and suggested they broadcast special “alerts” so that they could help prevent such incidents in the future. In response, the Dallas Association of Radio Managers teamed up with local law-enforcement in northern Texas and developed this innovative early warning system to help find abducted children. 

Once law enforcement has been notified about an abducted child, they must first determine if the case meets the AMBER Plan’s criteria for triggering an alert. Each program has its own criteria.  The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children suggests three criteria that should be met before an Alert is activated:

1.  Law enforcement confirms a child has been abducted

2.  Law enforcement believes that the child is in danger of serious bodily harm or death

3.  There are enough descriptors about the child, abductor, and/or suspect’s vehicle 

     to believe an immediate broadcast will help

 

Sunday, December 19, 2004

The Garrity Warning

This is a topic that every law officer should know inside and out.

Simply, Garrity is an invocation that may be made by an officer being questioned regarding actions that may result in criminal prosecution.  

By invoking the Garrity rule, the officer is invoking his or her right against self incrimination. Any statements made after invoking Garrity, may only be used for department investigation purposes and not for criminal prosecution purposes.

For more information and the actual Garrity Warning, click here.

 

Sunday, December 19, 2004

New Jersey Critical Incident Stress Management Team 

There is an excellent resource available to New Jersey LEO's knows as the New Jersey Critical Incident Stress Management Team.  This team is comprised of specially trained officers from around the state, and they specialize in helping officers who have having difficulty or who have been involved in critical incidents.  They will even come to the scene of an incident if necessary. 

This is a great resource for supervisors, and their number should be kept handy in the event that you may need them.  The team is chaired by Bob Rice from Port Authority Transit PD.   Bob runs the program which is made up of volunteers from law enforcement, fire, first-aid, education and mental health fields.  

To visit the site, click here.

 

Photograph of belt buckles designed with hidden knivesSunday, December 12, 2004

Street Survival - Identifying Belt Knives

The November, 2004 issue of the FBI Bulletin contains an blurb on "Belt Knives." 

Click here to visit the actual FBI publication and view the issue for further information including additional photos.

 

Sunday, December 12, 2004

Investigative Resources

One of this site's best pages is one of this site's least visited pages.  Let's say you are conducting an investigation where you need to accomplish the following:

  • Identify a pill found on a suspect

  • Determine the exact position of a commercial airliner currently in the air

  • Verify someone's social security number

  • Obtain a photo of an inmate in prison

  • See who is the owner of a particular website

  • Translate a letter from Italian to English

  • Convert German Deutsche marks to American dollars.

All of this and more can be accomplished from our Investigative Resources page.

 

Monday, December 6, 2004

Attention Patch Collectors

For those of you who participate in the hobby of collecting police patches, you can find a whole assortment of them for sale on the Internet on EBAY.  Take a look.

 

 

Sunday, November 28, 2004

Excellent Product

There is nothing more offensive than when a prisoner spits at you.  It is absolutely disgusting and infuriating.  There is a relatively new product on the market which solves this problem. 

It is called the TranZport Hood.  Simply, it is a cloth and mesh hood that is put over the prisoner's head.  He can spit all he wants.  This hood will trap all of his saliva in the hood with him, but he will still easily get air.  Streicher's Law Enforcement Products carries the TranZport Hood, and it can be purchased online.  As of this writing, the hood goes for $4.95.  Oh, it should not be used on any person that is unconscious, vomiting, in respiratory distress or in obvious need of medical attention and persons wearing a hood should be under constant supervision of the responsible parties.  (TJ, the hood goes on the prisoner's head, not the officer's head.  :)    )

 

Sunday, November 28, 2004

Honor Legion - What is it?

The Honor Legion.  You have probably heard of them.  You might have been given one of their courtesy cards.  The Honor Legion is a law enforcement fraternal organization.  Following is a letter from Jim Homwey, a senior member:

I'm Jim Homwey, 2nd Vice President of the Honor Legion.  For those of you who are not familiar with the honor legion, it is a police fraternal organization of the "finest of the finest" law enforcement officers. Any person who is a bona fide active and paid member of any regular law enforcement agency shall be eligible to apply for active membership in this association subject to the restrictions and limitations hereinafter provided.  Elected and appointed officials are not eligible. Membership is available to any member who has risked his or her life to save a human life or whose life has been in imminent risk of danger from an armed adversary.  Final determinations shall be at the discretion of the executive board of the Honor Legion.  Be advised that there are three distinctly different new member applications:

1.  Active members with NJ jurisdiction
2.  Active members without NJ jurisdiction
3.  Retired members

See new membership information and other New Jersey Honor Legion information at our website NJHL.com or contact me at 2NDVP@njhl.COM.

Fraternally yours,

Jim Homwey, Jr.
2nd Vice President of NJ Honor Legion

 

 

 

Wednesday, November 3, 2004

Ford Crown Victoria

Lawsuits have been filed around the nation against the Ford Motor Company claiming that the Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor has a design flaw making the vehicle prone to explosion and fire upon high speed rear impacts.  There have been instances around the country where officers lost their lives in rear-end accidents not from the collision but from the subsequent fire.

Click here for Ford's Crown Victoria Police Interceptor Law Enforcement Website.  

 

Wednesday, November 3, 2004

Internal Affairs Investigations

Every officer will one day face an internal affairs investigation.  It's just inevitable.  As most of you know, there is an entire AG Guideline on Internal Affairs.  It is crucial that you are familiar with the Guideline in order to protect your rights.  There are a lot of protections built into the Guideline that can help you when it is your time.  

For instance, did you know that you're allowed to tape record the interview between yourself and those interviewing you.  According to the Guideline...

"In cases of potential criminal conduct or serious disciplinary infractions the agency should make an audio or video recording of the interview, or should make a stenographic record. A transcript or copy of the recording shall be made available to the officer, if applicable, at the appropriate stage of a criminal or disciplinary proceeding. If the subject officer wishes to make a recording of the interview, he or she may do so, and a copy of the recording shall be made available to the department upon request, at the agency's expense. Agencies should consider adopting a policy requiring officers to inform the agency or the internal affairs investigator if the officer plans to record the interview."

Most IA investigators are fair, and they'll  support you if you're in the right, but you should prepare for the worst case scenario.  Click here to see the actual Guideline.

 

 

Monday, October 25, 2004

Tactics - Surviving Prisoner Searches

According to the FBI, "For the 10-year period 1993 through 2002, 20 officers were killed while handling or transporting prisoners."

This is unacceptable.

In a previous Roll Call piece, we assembled a great quote which all should heed:  "The search of a suspect ends when all possible areas have been searched, not when something is found."

The FBI Bulletin May 2004 Volume 73 Number 5 contains an excellent article on prisoner searches that is definitely worth a read.  Also, print it out and post it on the bulletin board in your headquarters.

 

Monday, October 18, 2004

New Street Survival Seminar

Caliber Press, unquestionably, offers the premiere program in street survival.  Many of us have attended it, and if you haven't you should.

However, there is a new Street Survival Seminar coming to a location near you.  It is called the Street Crimes Seminar, and it is being offered by John E. Reid and Associates. 

The three-day Reid program will cover a lot of material relevant to street level operations including officer safety, informants, hidden compartments, interviews, and more. 

Rather than taking this program "instead of" the Caliber Press program, take it "in addition to" the Caliber Press program.  There is no such thing as too much training.

Click here to visit their website.

 

Monday, October 18, 2004

How to Avoid a Speeding Ticket

One of our visitors sent us this link.

It is to a web page that outlines steps on how to avoid a speeding ticket.  The language is colorful, but you might get a kick out of it.  Also, it is not written in the normal we-hate-police speak. 

Click here to take a look.

 

Monday, October 11, 2004

Irrelevant but Interesting

       The United States Secret Service creates codenames for dignitaries and others that they are sworn to protect.  Here are a couple:

 

George Bush II Trailblazer
Jenna Bush Twinkle
Dick Cheney Angler
Bill Clinton Elvis
Hillary Clinton Evergreen
Chelsea Clinton Energy
Al Gore Sundance
George Bush I Timberwolf
Barbara Bush Tranquility
Dan Quayle Scorecard
Ronald Reagan Rawhide
Nancy Reagan Rainbow
Jimmy Carter Deacon

 

Thursday, October 7, 2004

Classification of Information

While it is not something with which we are normally involved, it is interesting nonetheless.  With a few modifications, though, it could actually be used by any agency to regulate who has access to certain information

The United States Department of Defense has a formal hierarchy of classification of information based on its sensitivity which attaches to personnel classification for information access.  Take a look:     

  • Top secret – this is the highest security level, and is defined as information which would cause "exceptionally grave damage" to national security if disclosed to the public. This classification is most often subdivided on the basis of "need to know", and includes such information as the design of cutting-edge weaponry, etc.
  • Secret – the second highest classification may include, for example, details of other security measures and procedures. It is defined as information which would cause "serious damage" to national security if disclosed.
  • Confidential – is the lowest classification level. It is defined as information which would "damage" national security if disclosed.
  • Unclassified – not technically a "classification", this is the default, and refers to information which can be released to individuals without a clearance. Information which was previously classified under one of the above levels is often declared "unclassified" at a certain time because its age has made its classification no longer necessary. Past troop movements are one example; they may be of paramount importance before occurring, and shortly after, but ten years later will not require classification. There have been (controversial) attempts to make all information in certain nuclear-related fields classified from its origination; these have faced challenges in court. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954 is the law most often mentioned in this context. The fact that a document is unclassified does not necessarily mean it can be released to the public -- it can be restricted to certain distributions, but an individual doesn't have to be "cleared" to access it, only have a need-to-know. This type of data is commonly referred to as Sensitive but Unclassified (SBU)

Classified U.S. government documents are required to be stamped with their classification at the top and bottom of each page, and there are various other regulations for the handling and storage of such documents.

 

Thursday, October 7, 2004

When a Search Ends

With everything we have learned from those who have fallen before us, it is inconceivable that an officer can be hurt or killed due to a previous poor search.

The search of a suspect ends when all possible areas have been searched, not when something is found.  Too often, when contraband is located, the search ends or it is done half ass because the searching officer thinks that he or she has found the suspect's hiding spot or finding a "mother load" distracts us from properly completing the search.

The search of a suspect ends when all possible areas have been searched, not when something is found.

 

Sunday, September 26, 2004

Police & Fire Mortgage Plan 

This past week the Federal Reserve raised the prime rate which often signals an increase in mortgage rates.

The New Jersey Police and fire Mortgage rate, however, remains at 5.41%. This is for a thirty-year-mortgage with zero points and loan amounts up to $300,000.

For more information, click here.

 

Sunday, September 19, 2004

A Lesson on Pursuits

Two years ago, Detroit, Michigan cops were involved in a pursuit.  Six two-man  patrol cars were chasing a stolen car.  Thirteen minutes into the pursuit, the supervisor called it off.  According to Detroit Police, five of the cars ignored the order.  The pursuit reportedly continued.  Allegedly, one or more of the patrol cars turned off their overhead lights and siren and followed the vehicle into other jurisdictions.  The pursuit ended when one of the patrol cars crashed into a bystander's vehicle killing a passenger in that vehicle.

Ten of the officers were immediately suspended.  Their police union fought the suspensions and charges, and for all we know all of these officers were completely innocent, but that is not the lesson here.

Pursuits are deadly.  Most seriously, they are deadly to officers and citizens, but they area also deadly to careers. 

Current laws are so strict that officers - even when following the law - could end up at the defense table.  If it's not worth it, just get him another day.  And, as hard as it may be to swallow, if a pursuit is called off, don't push it.

 

Sunday, September 19, 2004

MV Stops -  Asking the Driver to Step Out of the Car

There is well-established case law in New Jersey that allows police officers to ask the driver of a lawfully stopped vehicle to step to the rear of the car.  You need no justification to make such a request.  

This is an excellent tool that should be used more often.  It increases officer safety by removing the officer from the roadway close to passing cars, it opens up the driver's seat area for better visual inspection, and it is good for separating the driver from other occupants of the vehicle to see if their stories match.

However, just because this is permitted, it doesn't mean that you should do this in every situation.  Absent extraordinary circumstances, you should never have anyone exit the vehicle unless you have additional officers present.  Whenever possible, you should always outnumber the bad guys.   Safety comes first.   This provision applies only to the driver.  See New Jersey v. Smith.

 

Tuesday, September 14, 2004

Street Survival for Women in Law Enforcement

Calibre Press, the company most know for the Street Survival Seminar series, is holding a unique seminar this November.  It is a street survival seminar designed for women in law enforcement.  Below are some of the topics to be covered:

  • Tactical updates and skills
  • Training and equipment issues specific to females
  • Pregnancy on the job / parenting as a cop
  • Off-duty survival and deadly force decision-making
  • Using physiological and psychological differences to your advantage
  • How to manage the effects of police work on relationships
  • Networking with hundreds of other women in law enforcement

For further information, visit the Calibre Press Website.

 

Tuesday, September 14, 2004

Interesting notes on death investigation

  • At death, the body starts to drop from it's normal 98.6 degrees by a factor of 3 degrees the first hour and a factor of 1 degree each subsequent hour.  Then, after 30 hours, it starts to go up again because of the heat generated by decomposition (but this varies by room or outside temperature, so you need to know weather conditions). 

  • Rigor mortis is the condition where the body becomes stiff. The body is limp until about 5-6 hours after death, then a hardness begins to set in around the jaw area in front of the ear (temporal mandibular joint area). It then spreads throughout the body for a period of time, and then the body goes limp again. The following chart illustrates:

               stiffness in jaw -- 6 hours after death

               stiffness in upper torso -- 12 hours after death

               stiffness in whole body -- 18 hours after death

               limpness returns to body -- 36 hours after death

  • Lividity is the effect of gravity on blood. You'll note that after death, all the loose blood in the body runs down to the lowest point of gravity. If the dead person is on their back, you'll notice these bluish-purple stains on their back. Lividity begins after only 3 hours, and the blood becomes dried after only 12 hours, so lividity is something to look for quick. It tells you if the body has been moved or transported when there are lividity marks in unusual places instead of the lowest point of gravity where you find the body. 

  • The eyes dilate 7 hours after death (dilation is an enlargement of the black pupil area).

  • Decomposition begins in 30 hours and then starts to rise rapidly after 48 hours

 

Sunday, September 5, 2004

NJLawman.com for Massachusetts?

Through our Internet travels we discovered the Massachusetts version of NJLawman.com.  It is called MassCops.com

Run by a Massachusetts officer, MassCops.com is an excellent website and resource for all officers.  One of our favorite parts is a recently added article section where officers can submit articles on their areas of expertise to be published on the website. 

They also have an excellent Headlines section that allows visitors to view different topics of headlines. 

The site has a message board and forum which offers an excellent opportunity to network with law officers from Massachusetts. 

Stop by MassCops.com.  It is worth the visit.

 

 

Sunday, September 5, 2004

Officer Survival - Clothing for Bad Guys

Walt from NJDOC found this one.

There are now lines of clothing designed for drug dealers and other criminals. This specific one "distinguishes itself from other brands with hidden pockets and gun holsters."

Click here to take a look.

 

Sunday, September 5, 2004

Save the Emerson PD

If you are a regular of our headlines section, you have read about the back and forth attempts to merge the Emerson Police Department into another agency. 

Some are calling it a disbanding, not merging, of the department and are fighting it no matter what it's called.

A website has been created to muster support against the merger from both Emerson and Bergen County residents.  It contains "myths and truths" about the proposal and a host of other information.  To view this website, click here.

 

Sunday, August 29, 2004

Newly Uncovered Line of Duty Death

The brilliant folks over at the Officer Down Memorial Page website recently uncovered a previously unreported New Jersey line of duty death.

Special Policeman Alfred B. Jewell of the Rahway Police Department in New Jersey was killed on Sunday, March 3, 1895.  Click here to see the web page created for Officer Jewell, and please leave an online "reflection" for him. 

 

Sunday, August 29, 2004

Some National Numbers for Contract Time

Where Does Your Agency Stand in the National Income Level?

The national median household income for the 2001-2003 period was $43,527. New Jersey had the highest median household income in the nation at $55,221.

Somerset County is the wealthiest county in the nation with median income of $89,289.

Runner up counties include Morris County, with an $82,025 median household income that ranks fourth in the nation, Monmouth County, ranking 19th with $67,761, and Bergen County, placing 22nd with $67,288.

All of these figures were taken from U.S. Census Bureau figures on median household income released Thursday

 

Sunday, August 29, 2004

Inter-Agency Transfer

The New Jersey Department of Personnel has a program where law enforcement officers of agencies which fall under NJDOP may transfer to another NJDOP agency without having to go through the normal entry level route.  Agencies that have openings simply post the openings with NJDOP, and officers from other agencies can apply for the position.  This is a little-known program, but it is very interesting and will most likely expand.  Click here go to the NJDOP site and view which agencies have posted openings.

 

Sunday, August 22, 2004

Law Enforcement K-9 Stories Memorialized

For those interested and involved with law enforcement K-9's, we found a book containing tales from K-9 officers and their dogs.  Available in hard cover, Heroes All Without Question,  contains 657 pages of memorials, photos, information, heroic inspirational stories, of all types working dogs and a few law enforcement horses. It also talks about life with a K-9 partner.  Click here to visit their website.

 

Sunday, August 22, 2004

Stress and the Job

There is a direct link between the average life expectancy of a police officer -- only 59 years -- and stress. The average life expectancy of a civilian is about 75, which means that the average police officer dies about 16 years earlier than the civilian public.  Medical research has proven that high levels of continuous stress cause many physical ailments and diseases. 

 

Sunday, August 22, 2004

Excellent NJ Statute

Under the False Public Alarms statute there is a subsection which was added in 2002 that doesn't seem to be used as much as it could be.  It is the provision regarding the knowingly placing of non-emergent calls to 9-1-1.  Obviously, we don't want to be dragging people away who misdialed when trying to call Mexico or when children hit the speed dial button, as the statute is not designed to prohibit accidental 9-1-1 calls.  However, it is a good statute to have in your arsenal when an appropriate situation does arise. Below is the text of 2C:33-3, subsection e.

2C:33-3 False public alarms.
e.  A person is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree if the person knowingly places a call to a 9-1-1 emergency telephone system without purpose of reporting the need for 9-1-1 service.

 

 

Sunday, August 15, 2004

Street Survival

You get behind the suspicious vehicle, activate your lights, and slowly come to a stop on the shoulder behind it.  

Two things you should be watching for.  First, the vehicle's brake lights went on when it began to stop, but did they go off?  If they didn't, the driver may be waiting to speed off when you approach.  It might be a good time to use your PA and instruct the driver to put it in park.

Second and less reliable, what about the reverse lights?  While this only applies to automatics, most cars, when being shifted into park, will shift pass the reverse gear causing the reverse lights to quickly go on and off.  

 

Monday, August 9, 2004

Tool and Warning

Pictured to the right is the pager pal.

Simply, it is an inside-the-pants holster that uses a pager instead of a metal clip for support.  It seems to be an excellent off-duty alternative for those who carry medium to small-sized weapons.

We also post this as a warning.  Pagers are much less common today.  If you happen to be dealing with a suspect who has a pager attached to his or her belt, remember this picture.

To visit the website of the company that sells this product, click here.

 

Wednesday, August 4, 2004

ROR for Juveniles?

There is a little known statute in the 2A criminal code that permits law enforcement to release juveniles on their own recognizance.  Yes, we mean releasing them and just letting them leave or driving them home.

The provision can be found in 2A:4A-35 Release of Juvenile on Own Recognizance.  The statute reads as follows:

2A:4A-35. Release of juvenile on own recognizance

A juvenile charged with delinquency may be released at either the police or court level on his own recognizance if all of the following circumstances have been met:

a. The nature of the offense charged is not such that a danger to the community would exist if the juvenile were released;

b. There is no parent, guardian or other appropriate adult custodian to whom the juvenile could be released and all reasonable measures have been exhausted by either police or court personnel to locate and contact any such person;

c. The juvenile is at least 14 years of age;

d. The identity and address of the juvenile are verified through a positive form of identification; and

e. Reasonable certainty exists on the part of the releasing authority that upon release, the juvenile will return to school or home safely and will appear at his hearing.

L.1982, c. 77, s. 16, eff. Dec. 31, 1983.

 

Wednesday, August 4, 2004

Pursuits

At one time pursuits were considered one of the more exciting aspects of law enforcement. Today, many supervisors avoid them at all costs whenever possible.

A thorough read of the NJ Attorney General Guideline on Pursuits reveals the no-win situation. It basically outlaws pursuits and puts 100% of the risk and liability on the shoulders of the pursing officer and the supervisor. If things go well in a pursuit, nobody cares, but the Guideline sets up finger pointing for when pursuits turn bad.

The stringent guidelines for pursuits, however, do seem to be needed. Consider the following:

More than 350 people die each year as a result of police pursuits*

Since 1997, 23 law enforcement officers have died as a result of pursuits*

161 law enforcement officers have died as a result of pursuits throughout history*

1,784 people died between 1994 and 1998 as a result of pursuits*

The bottom line is that pursuits are the most dangerous, and liability ridden part of law enforcement. Absent assaulting a cop, a kidnapping, or a very serious crime, they just don't seem to be worth it.

*FBI Bulletin, July 2002

 


 

 

Sunday, July 25, 2004

Body Armor Funds Now Available

Several days ago the State DCJ announced the availability of body armor replacement funds for 2004.  Everything you need to know is posted on their website.  Click here to visit the page with the relevant information.

 

Wednesday, July 14, 2004

New Products

Okay, you are the supervisor or the OIC, and when of your guys advises over the radio that he or she is in a pursuit.  Quickly, you start heading in his or her direction while scrambling to remember the questions from the AG Pursuit Guideline that you must ask in your role as the supervisor.  

OTJ Gear has come up with an excellent product to help.  It is a reference card that lists your responsibilities.  It also contains restrictions on pursuits, situations where pursuits are authorized, mandatory termination conditions, and the enumerated offenses which justify pursuit.  

Another new product they offer is a reference card containing the NHTSA recommended Standardized Field Sobriety tests.  By using this when administering tests, you can testify in court that you read your tests from a standardized reference instead of giving the tests from memory.  

Click here to see these and other new products.

 

Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Interview and Interrogation

We found an excellent website with a wealth of information on interview and interrogation.

The site contains articles with some fascinating information ranging from kinesics to indicators of deception.  

Plus, from the site you can sign up for a free newsletter.  Some of the topics in the upcoming issue are interview room tips, recent research on interrogation, interviewer tools, humor in the interview room, successful interviewer techniques, etc...

Definitely worth the visit.  Click here to take a look.

 

Monday, June 28, 2004

National Carry Law

For many years different law enforcement advocate groups have been pushing for a law which would allow sworn law officers to carry their weapons not only in their home state but in all 50 states.  Last week this effort took a major leap.

The bill is titled H.R. 218, and it passed in the U.S. House of Representatives on June 23rd by a wide margin.  The next step will be a vote in the U.S. Senate.  

According to LEAA, "President Bush has indicated his strong support and his willingness to promptly sign National Concealed Carry for Cops into law."  For more information, click here to visit the Law Enforcement Alliance of America Website.

 

Monday, June 28, 2004

Handcuffing

The radio crackles, and your headquarters confirms an active warrant for the person standing in front of your patrol car who you just stopped for an investigative detention. Backup is already there. What's next?

When we revert back to television, the bad guy would be told to put his hands on the car. He would be informed that there is a warrant for his arrest. We would then conduct a full search of his person. Finally, we would put him into handcuffs.

This procedure boggles the mind. The most dangerous time for us and most opportunistic time for him is the period before he is cuffed. If someone is going to be arrested, the first step should be the cuffing along with the "You're under arrest." Whether it be for a warrant or the CDS observed in plain view in his rear pocket or rear seat, put the cuffs on, and then continue with the search, Miranda, and other necessities. The importance of this cannot be emphasized enough. Cuff first! Cuff first! Cuff first!

 

Sunday, June 20, 2004

Excellent Resource for All

Occasionally you may be in need of information on a certain municipality whether it be for contract time or an investigation.  This resource should help.

The New Jersey Uniform Crime Report which is prepared by the State Police each year contains a chapter entitled "New Jersey Municipal-County Offense & Demographic Data."  

This chapter contains the population, size, crime rate by category, and police department data for every agency in New Jersey broken down by county.  This will be especially helpful for law enforcement job seekers trying to learn more about a particular agency.

Also, we have added this resource to our Investigative Resources page so you will always know where to find it.

 

Sunday, June 20, 2004

MV Stops

On occasion, you walk up on a car you have stopped and immediately get a feeling that something is wrong. Sometimes it is best not to reveal your hand until you have backup. However, you want to maintain control over the situation.

A good tactic and bluff would be to tell the occupants (before returning to your car) "Okay, my partner is going to write you out a warning. He'll be with you in a second." Here, you suggest that a second officer is already present. You also suggest that they are about to be released.  This technique works best at night when their visibility is limited.

 

Sunday, June 13, 2004

Second Leading Cause of Line of Duty Deaths

In 2003, gunfire accounted for the deaths of 47 officers throughout the country.  41 officers died from injuries sustained in motor vehicle accidents.

This figure does not include motorcycle accidents, 8 officer deaths; vehicle pursuits, 13 officer deaths; or officers who were struck by vehicles, 7 officer deaths.

Combined, 69 officers died from vehicle related incidents.

The finest vest, the best tactics, a state-of-the-art ankle holster, and the most highly trained fellow officers are not enough when it comes to car accidents.  Slow down, be careful, get to the call in one piece, and wear your seatbelt.

 

 

Sunday, June 6, 2004

Over Committing

This is an issue that should be talked about more.  Over committing is when an officer goes too far into a situation for which he or she is not prepared or does not have adequate back-up.

An example would be when the officer is the first to arrive at a domestic and, instead of waiting for more assistance, the officer goes inside, lets the door shut behind him or her, and moves into an area of the dwelling where retreat is not readily available.

Over committing is when an officer makes an MV stop and orders all four occupants to exit the car with no other officers present.

Over committing is when an officer is alone and goes out with a subject who has a warrant and signals an intention to arrest without having backup on the scene or close.

For every call, for every investigative detention, for every MV stop, the words "Do not over commit!" should be floating around every officer's head.  "DO NOT OVER COMMIT!"

 

Sunday, June 6, 2004

Excellent Tool

A tactical mirror is an excellent tool for anyone who dons a uniform, and it should be kept right on your belt. 

It is essential for all LEO's whether you're trying to get a peek into the cell of a violent inmate or effecting a building search during a high school shooting situation. Simply, it is a necessity for every personal arsenal of every modern-day, tactical-thinking law officer.

 

 

Sunday, May 23, 2004

Recording Confessions

The New Jersey Attorney General's Office addressed the electronic recording of stationhouse confessions in a recently issued statement.

The AG's Office acknowledged that some counties have already put in place certain measures designed to ensure the integrity of the process.  Additionally, they indicated that they would not, for now, issue one, inflexible guideline for all to follow.  

Instead, the Attorney General's Office issued the following "Policy Statement" which "shall be binding on all law enforcement agencies in this State, and shall remain in effect until rescinded or superseded by Order of the Attorney General."

If a person who is suspected of committing a homicide [emphasis added] is asked by a law enforcement officer to provide or acknowledge a written statement in a stationhouse custodial setting, the investigating officer should, whenever feasible, arrange to electronically record (preferably video record) the suspect’s statement or acknowledgment so as to establish a permanent and objective record that the suspect had been advised of his or her constitutional rights and that any such incriminating statement or acknowledgment was actually made by the suspect.  Electronic recordation of the final statement or acknowledgment may be done on notice to and with the express permission of the suspect, or may be done surreptitiously at the discretion of the investigating officer. The electronic recordation of the suspect’s final statement or acknowledgment may be in addition to or in lieu of having the suspect sign a traditional written statement.

When a written statement is signed or acknowledged by a suspect in custody and no electronic recordation is made, the officer taking the written statement or acknowledgment shall document the reasons why the statement or acknowledgment was not electronically recorded (e.g., electronic recordation equipment was not reasonably available at the time that the written statement or acknowledgment was given; the suspect indicated a desire that the statement or acknowledgment not be electronically recorded, etc.). The documented reasons for not electronically recording the final statement or acknowledgment shall be provided to the appropriate prosecuting agency.

 

Sunday, May 16, 2004

Does NJLawman.com Have a Sister Website?

Hardly, but NJWeedman.com is worth the visit.  It is to the marijuana community what NJLawman.com is to the law enforcement community.

Based somewhere in Burlington County, the site appears to be run by Edward Forchion, a marijuana activist.  He also believes in legalizing prostitution and offers his services for $250.00.  The picture to the right is the header for his prostitution page.

Take a visit, sign the guestbook (we did), and enjoy.  Click here to visit the website.

 

Sunday, May 9, 2004

On a typical prime-time night during the last three months of 2003, Fox News Channel averaged 1.46 million viewers. CNN had 909,000 viewers and MSNBC had 293,000 viewers, according to Nielsen ratings.

 

Sunday, May 2, 2004

Anti-Cop Website

We've said before that we don't like giving attention to anti-law enforcement websites, but some are just so entertaining.  This one is one of the funniest.  

It seems to be run by a group of anarchists.  Anarchist are always the best of all our anti-law enforcement friends.  These are the same folks who show up at WTO meetings wearing bandannas over the faces.  

If you have thick skin and a good sense of humor, pay these guys a visit.  You can really lose track of time navigating through their propaganda.   Definitely, two thumbs up.  (Make sure to visit the link on their page on how to spot an undercover officer.  Real good stuff)  Click here to visit their site.

 

Sunday, May 2, 2004

Excellent Resource - NJ Law Enforcement Directory

On the New Jersey Attorney General's website is a directory of all law enforcement agencies in New Jersey. 

The directory contains information including telephone numbers, fax numbers, addresses and the names of the agency heads of every law enforcement agency in New Jersey.  It also has same information for prosecutor's offices, police academies, jails and just about every relevant, law enforcement entity you could ask for.  

The page is in PDF format, and can be reached by clicking here.  We will be adding this link to our "Resources" page in the event you need it in the future.  

 

Sunday, April 25, 2004

Tactics - Passenger Side Approach

Using the passenger side approach of a stopped vehicle is something we all know about but rarely employ. You shouldn't use it just for high-risk situations. As with everything else, it is necessary to practice and be familiar with this technique as there are new considerations. For example, when making such an approach in an area where there is a curb, you don't want to stand on the roadway between the passenger door and the curb. You should stand on top of the curb. Otherwise, if the passenger door suddenly opens, you would be pushed back and could trip over the curb. The same applies with a drainage ditch.

To become more familiar with this technique, use a passenger side approach on a more frequent basis when circumstances allow. Use this approach every other stop for the next few weeks until you are completely comfortable with it. After that, use it every fifth stop to maintain your familiarity.

Sunday, April 25, 2004

When responding to any DOA call, no matter what the circumstances, you should treat it as a homicide until proven otherwise.  

  • At death, the body starts to drop from it's normal 98.6 degrees by a factor of 3 degrees the first hour and a factor of 1 degree each subsequent hour. Then, after 30 hours, it starts to go up again because of the heat generated by decomposition (but this varies by room or outside temperature, so you need to know weather conditions).

 

  • Rigor mortis is the condition where the body becomes stiff. The body is limp until about 5-6 hours after death, then a hardness begins to set in around the jaw area in front of the ear (temporal mandibular joint area). It then spreads throughout the body for a period of time, and then the body goes limp again. The following chart illustrates:

stiffness in jaw -- 6 hours after death

stiffness in upper torso -- 12 hours after death

stiffness in whole body -- 18 hours after death

limpness returns to body -- 36 hours after death

  • Lividity is the effect of gravity on blood. You'll note that after death, all the loose blood in the body runs down to the lowest point of gravity. If the dead person is on their back, you'll notice these bluish-purple stains on their back. Lividity begins after only 3 hours, and the blood becomes dried after only 12 hours, so lividity is something to look for quick. It tells you if the body has been moved or transported when there are lividity marks in unusual places instead of the lowest point of gravity where you find the body.

 

  • The eyes dilate 7 hours after death (dilation is an enlargement of the black pupil area).

 

  • Decomposition begins in 30 hours and then starts to rise rapidly after 48 hours

 

Sunday, April 18, 2004

Newly Uncovered Line of Duty Deaths

Steve Weiss and the other amazing and truly dedicated volunteers at the Officer Down Memorial Page website have uncovered two more instances of previously unrecorded line of duty deaths involving New Jersey officers.

The first is Isaac Hibbs of the Camden County Sheriff's Office who was killed in 1916, and the second is John Clark of the Harrison Police Department who died in 1897.

Please click the above links and leave a memorial message on the pages of these officers.  

Also, if you are able, we ask that you make a donation to the Officer Down Memorial Page.  You can go to their site and click the donation link on the top link bar.  The ODMP site is such a necessary part of our culture, and it is run by all volunteers.  The people involved are doing God's work, and we cannot thank and tout their efforts enough.

 

Sunday, April 1 8, 2004

A Powerful and Often Overlooked Statute

Okay, so you arrest this guy and find a knife, nun-chucks, or some other non-firearm type weapons on him. Normally, you charge him (if you even bother) with the basic fourth degree Unlawful Possession of a Weapon statute, 2C:39-5, only to have it come back to municipal court a month later. If he was also in violation of the Certain Persons Not to Have Weapons statute, 2C:39-7, and you charged him with that, it would have added a second fourth degree offense significantly increasing the chances of the case remaining in Superior Court.

Even better, if you arrested him for just the third degree offense of Unlawful Possession of a Firearm, and he was in violation of 2C:39-7, you would now be adding a second degree offense by charging him with Certain Persons Not to Have Weapons which comes with a presumption of incarceration.

Basically, the "Certain Persons" prohibits certain persons from possessing weapons. These certain persons are those who have been convicted of certain offenses on a previous occasion including but not limited to aggravated assault, arson, burglary, escape, extortion, homicide, kidnapping, robbery, aggravated sexual assault, sexual assault, bias intimidation. There are other offenses and situations listed in the statute as well.

See 2C:39-7 for the actual law.

 

 

Thursday, April 8, 2004

New Cell Phone Statute for New Jersey

As you know, some agencies are a little slow in getting the word out on new laws.  Below is the actual text of the new cell phone statute for New Jersey.  It goes into effect on July 1, 2004.  The violation should be written under 39:4-97.3.

39:4-97.3 Use of hands-free wireless telephone in moving vehicle; definitions; enforcement.

1. a. The use of a wireless telephone by an operator of a moving motor vehicle on a public road or highway shall be unlawful except when the telephone is a hands-free wireless telephone, provided that its placement does not interfere with the operation of federally required safety equipment and the operator exercises a high degree of caution in the operation of the motor vehicle.

b. The operator of a motor vehicle may use a hand-held wireless telephone while driving with one hand on the steering wheel only if:

(1) The operator has reason to fear for his life or safety, or believes that a criminal act may be perpetrated against himself or another person; or

(2) The operator is using the telephone to report to appropriate authorities a fire, a traffic accident, a serious road hazard or medical or hazardous materials emergency, or to report the operator of another motor vehicle who is driving in a reckless, careless or otherwise unsafe manner or who appears to be driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. A hand-held wireless telephone user's telephone records or the testimony or written statements from appropriate authorities receiving such calls shall be deemed sufficient evidence of the existence of all lawful calls made under this paragraph.

As used in this act, "hands-free wireless telephone" means a mobile telephone that has an internal feature or function, or that is equipped with an attachment or addition, whether or not permanently part of such mobile telephone, by which a user engages in a conversation without the use of either hand; provided, however, this definition shall not preclude the use of either hand to activate, deactivate, or initiate a function of the telephone.

"Use" of a wireless telephone shall include, but not be limited to, talking or listening to another person on the telephone.

c. Enforcement of this act by State or local law enforcement officers shall be accomplished only as a secondary action when the operator of a motor vehicle has been detained for a violation of Title 39 of the Revised Statutes or another offense.

d. A person who violates this section shall be fined no less than $100 or more than $250.

e. No motor vehicle points or automobile insurance eligibility points pursuant to section 26 of P.L.1990, c.8 (C.17:33B-14) shall be assessed for this offense.

f. The Chief Administrator of the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission shall develop and undertake a program to notify and inform the public as to the provisions of this act.  L.2003,c.310,s.1.

39:4-97.4 Inapplicability of act to certain officials.

2.The prohibitions set forth in this act shall not be applicable to any of the following persons while in the actual performance of their official duties: a law enforcement officer; a member of a paid, part-paid, or volunteer fire department or company; or an operator of an authorized emergency vehicle.  L.2003,c.310,s.2.

39:4-97.5 Supersedes, preemption of local ordinances.

3.This act supersedes and preempts all ordinances of any county or municipality with regard to the use of a wireless telephone by an operator of a motor vehicle.  L.2003,c.310,s.3.

 

Wednesday, April 7, 2004

Investigations and Hypnosis

Using hypnosis during criminal investigations is certainly not a widely used or accepted practice in New Jersey law enforcement. However, the tool of hypnosis has been hanging around the outer fringes of law enforcement for some time.

We recently found a website that discusses the place of hypnosis in modern-day law enforcement. The site was designed by a law enforcement officer who took an interest in using hypnosis in cases where other leads had been exhausted. It is a quick and very interesting read. The author sites all of his sources, and there are links for additional information. Having at least a familiarity with hypnosis and its possible uses in investigations is probably a good thing for all investigators. 

Click here to visit the site.

 

Wednesday, April 7, 2004

State-of-the-Art Training, Room & Board, Full Accommodations and Free?

I know we've covered this one before, but it is well deserved.

It's called the Northeast Counterdrug Training Center, and it's located in Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania.  It's not just narcotics training either. They offer classes covering everything from Interview and Interrogation to Grant Writing to Search Warrant Execution.  

Located on the eastern side of Pennsylvania, it is a very convenient location for New Jersey agencies. Many of their classes are held over several days, and they will put your officers up at no charge. That includes lodging, and meals at no charge. And again, there is no tuition to attend any of their classes. Yes, the entire course will cost your agency nothing.  

It is an excellent way to get your officers state-of-the-art training as well as rewarding officers for accomplishments. Most officers immensely enjoy going to schools, and this one is one of the finest.

Click here to visit their website.

 

 

Sunday, March 28, 2004

Law Enforcement Suicide

This is an issue that we like to keep up front.

Suicide claims many more officers than line-of-duty-deaths. Statistics vary, but it is estimated that the number of officers who commit suicide is double the rate of those who are murdered while on duty. Some studies suggest that the suicide rate is five times greater.

This is so unacceptable. In the past we have written special reports on this issue, featured Roll Call pieces and posted information of New Jersey-based resources such as the NJ Critical Incident Management Team, the Cop 2 Cop Hotline, the the Mercury Critical Incident Stress Management Team.

Recently we found another tool to add to the list. It is a website called Tears of a Cop.  It is a well-organized, rich-in-content, excellent resource created by Police Officer Robert J Rehl, Jr.

This site contains a wealth of information that can be used by an officer suffering from depression or friends and family of an officer suffering from depression.  Fixing the problem will almost always require real help, but visiting this site may be a good first step to making the call.  Click here to visit the website.

 

Saturday, March 27, 2004

Do I put it on a summons or a warrant?

So you arrest the bad guy and bring him or her to the station. Often, you'll find yourself discussing with your fellow officers whether to charge him or her on a summons or a warrant. Below is some information that should help. Under the NJ Court Rules, specifically Rule 3:4-1, the above question is answered. Here is the easy way to remember it: everything must go on a summons except under the following circumstances:

(1) the defendant is charged with murder, kidnapping, aggravated manslaughter, manslaughter, robbery, aggravated sexual assault, sexual assault, aggravated criminal sexual contact, criminal sexual contact, second degree aggravated assault, aggravated arson, arson, burglary, violations of Chapter 35 of Title 2C that constitute first or second degree crimes, any crime involving the possession or use of a firearm, or conspiracies or attempts to commit such crimes;

(2) the defendant has been served with a summons and has failed to appear;

(3) there is reason to believe that the defendant is dangerous to self, other persons, or property;

(4) there is an outstanding warrant for the defendant;

(5) the defendant's identity or address is not known and a warrant is necessary to subject the defendant to the jurisdiction of the court; or

(6) there is reason to believe that the defendant will not appear in response to a summons.

You might have noticed that someone who was arrested that has a really bad attitude was not listed above. If you're going to put them on a warrant, you must be prepared to justify their incarceration by one of the above six points.

 

Sunday, March 21, 2004

New DWI Statute

       In case your agency is a bit slow in getting the word out to you, New Jersey has changed the per se blood alcohol content level for DWI from .10% BAC to .08%. BAC.  The text of the revised statute and first offense penalties are below:

 

39:4-50 Driving while intoxicated.

39:4-50. (a) Except as provided in subsection (g) of this section, a person who operates a motor vehicle while under the influence of intoxicating liquor, narcotic, hallucinogenic or habit-producing drug, or operates a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08% or more by weight of alcohol in the defendant's blood or permits another person who is under the influence of intoxicating liquor, narcotic, hallucinogenic or habit-producing drug to operate a motor vehicle owned by him or in his custody or control or permits another to operate a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08% or more by weight of alcohol in the defendant's blood shall be subject:

 

(1)For the first offense:

 

(i)  if the person's blood alcohol concentration is 0.08% or higher but less than 0.10%, or the person operates a motor vehicle while under the influence of intoxicating liquor, or the person permits another person who is under the influence of intoxicating liquor to operate a motor vehicle owned by him or in his custody or control or permits another person with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08% or higher but less than 0.10% to operate a motor vehicle, to a fine of not less than $250 nor more than $400 and a period of detainment of not less than 12 hours nor more than 48 hours spent during two consecutive days of not less than six hours each day and served as prescribed by the program requirements of the Intoxicated Driver Resource Centers established under subsection (f) of this section and, in the discretion of the court, a term of imprisonment of not more than 30 days and shall forthwith forfeit his right to operate a motor vehicle over the highways of this State for a period of three months;

(ii) if the person's blood alcohol concentration is 0.10% or higher, or the person operates a motor vehicle while under the influence of narcotic, hallucinogenic or habit-producing drug, or the person permits another person who is under the influence of narcotic, hallucinogenic or habit-producing drug to operate a motor vehicle owned by him or in his custody or control, or permits another person with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.10% or more to operate a motor vehicle, to a fine of not less than $300 nor more than $500 and a period of detainment of not less than 12 hours nor more than 48 hours spent during two consecutive days of not less than six hours each day and served as prescribed by the program requirements of the Intoxicated Driver Resource Centers established under subsection (f) of this section and, in the discretion of the court, a term of imprisonment of not more than 30 days and shall forthwith forfeit his right to operate a motor vehicle over the highways of this State for a period of not less than seven months nor more than one year;

 

(iii) For a first offense, a person also shall be subject to the provisions of P.L.1999, c.417 (C.39:4-50.16 et al.).

 

 

 

Sunday, March 7, 2004

Custom Everything

       If you need polo shirts, t-shirts, mugs, or just about anything bearing your logo or name embroidered or printed on it, a central-Jersey officer is offering assistance.

 

       McNamara Screen-printing and Embroidery specializes in custom jobs for law enforcement agencies.  He uses quality materials, and after your law enforcement discount is figured in the cost, his prices are outstanding.  Even if you have a service that you currently use, he is asking that you allow him to give you a quote on the job.   Click here for more information

 

 

Saturday, March 6, 2004

Drug Recognition Expert (DRE) Program

       Bill from Roxbury PD sent us this one.

 

       Several years ago New Jersey adopted a program which was born in the Los Angeles Police Department.  Simply, officers attend training to become highly skilled in diagnosing whether someone is under the influence of a drug.  It has proven to be very useful in DWI situations where alcohol doesn't appear to be the cause of impairment.  

 

       This procedure trains officers to use a standardized twelve-step evaluation process that allows the officer to determine whether the suspect is under the influence of drugs, and to determine the category of drug that is causing the observable impairment. The twelve-step procedure also allows the officer to rule in or out many medical conditions and injuries which may be contributing to the subject's impairment.

 

       While the DRE procedure's main objective is driving under the influence (DWI) enforcement, the procedures have been applied in probation and parole, drugs in the workplace issues and other areas where accurately identifying the drug-impaired individual is relevant.

 

       The New Jersey Association of Drug Recognition Experts is comprised of certified DRE officers from local, county and state law enforcement agencies, throughout the State.

 

       This program is the future in the war against drunk driving.

 

       If you think that your agency might be interested in having some officers go through the DRE training, click here to visit their website.  (Thanks Bill)

 

 

Monday, February 1, 2004

New Products for LEO's

       A New Jersey police officer recently launched an excellent new line of products.  Pictured to the right is one of them.  The company, On the Job Gear, offers quick reference cards for Title 2C, Title 39, accident reports, DWI field testing, and the line is growing.  Affordably priced, these valuable tools are essential to modern-day road warriors.  They can also prepare your jurisdiction's city, township or borough ordinances if ordered in bulk.  Products for New York, Pennsylvania and the Military Police are now available too.  You can visit their website at www.OTJGear.com

 

 

 

 

Sunday, February 22, 2004

Ready for Retirement

       In the past two years there has been a trend of police academies holding classes for officers gearing up for retirement.  Officers who have attended some of these classes have strongly recommended them for anyone within the 5-year-and-counting mark.  From all reports, there is a massive need for such instruction.  Some were shocked at how much they did not know.  Some of the topics include tax provisions, beneficiary dangers, DOP issues and requirements, and details of the pension system.  For more information, contact your local police academy or visit our Training and Schools page which has some of these classes listed.

 

 

Satruday, February 21, 2004

Strip Searches vs. Body Cavity Searches

       It is crucial that all New Jersey officers are familiar with the line that separates a search from a strip search or a body cavity search.  Following are the definitions of "Strip Search" and "Body Cavity Search" as listed in the Attorney General's Strip Search and Body Cavity Search Requirements and Procedures for Police Officers:

  1. Strip Search

    1. Removal or rearrangement of clothing to permit visual inspection of a person's

      1. undergarments; 2. buttocks; 3. anus; 4. genitals; 5. breasts

    2. The following does not constitute a strip search:

      1. removal or rearranging of clothing reasonably required to render medical treatment or assistance, or

      2. removal of articles of outer clothing, such as coats, ties, belts or shoelaces.

  2. Body Cavity Search

    1. Visual inspection or manual search of a person's

      1. anal cavity;  2.   vaginal cavity

 

 

Saturday, February 14, 2004

New Bill for "Less than Lethal Force"

       A bill introduced by Senator Joseph Coniglio (S-252) could open the door to giving NJ law enforcement more options in deadly force situations.  Currently, less than lethal force weapons and ammunition cannot be used unless the situation justifies the use of deadly force.  This, obviously, makes no sense.  An example would be firing bean bag rounds from a shot gun.  

 

       If this new legislation were to pass, it could add many new additions to our arsenals including bean bag rounds, taser guns, and pepperball ammunition.  As of this writing, the bill was passed in committee and now must be voted on in both the Assembly and the Senate.

 

 

Sunday, February 8, 2004

NJ Pension Phone Line Updated

       The automated phone line which provides pension loan information has been updated to December 31st.  If you are in the New Jersey Police & Fire Pension System, call 1-609-777-1777.  By using this automated phone line you can learn the following:   

  • Loan, Purchase, and Withdrawal Information

  • General Account Information

  • Retirement Information

  • Health Benefit Information

  • Deferred Compensation Information

  • (NJ Police & Fire Pension Website)

 

 

Saturday, February 7, 2004

Handling Bank Alarms  -  Send them out to us...

       Bank alarms are the bane of those trying to enjoy an otherwise pleasant dayshift.  While most are set off in error, ALL have to be treated as the real thing.

 

       When a bank alarm comes in, the OIC should instruct the dispatcher to first call the bank and ask if everything is okay.  Many agencies will ask the bank employee for a previously given code which would indicate that there is no problem.  Use caution with this practice as, more often than not, the employees are not properly trained and do not know the code.

 

       If this checks out, officers should pull up out of the view of the bank's windows.  The OIC should have the dispatcher direct the bank employee to walk out to the location of the patrol car.  If the bank employee seems okay, the officers should first try and assess the situation inside through the windows.  If everything still seems okay, officers should escort the bank employee back inside and make their own determination.  

 

       There is no reason that officers should blindly walk into a bank upon responding to a bank alarm.  Pre-designated meeting areas should also be avoided as they are too difficult to remember for officers who work in towns with many banks, and if the bank employees weren't properly trained in the designated area, their walking out to the wrong location could send false alarms.  

 

 

Sunday, February 1, 2004

Accident Reconstruction Calculator

       We found this site some time ago.  It contains a calculator for accident reconstruction.  Admittedly, we have zero knowledge in the immensely complicated area of accident reconstruction.  If any traffic safety officers have any feedback good or bad about this resource, give us an email.  Click here to visit the site.

 

 

Sunday, December 28, 2003

Contract Negotiations

       To arbitration or not to arbitration.  That is the question which locals wrestle with every few years when contract time approaches. 

 

       The New Jersey Public Employees Commission, more commonly known as PERC, has a webpage which catalogs the results of contract negotiations which have gone to arbitration.  It contains almost everything you could want including the municipality, the collective bargaining union, the arbitrator, the dates, etc.  It also contains the actual documentation listing the issues and the award.  It is an excellent resource come contract time.  The link to the site is as follows:  http://www.perc.state.nj.us/IAAwards.nsf/IssueDate_FS?OpenFrameSet

 

 

 

Wednesday, December 10, 2003

Line of Duty Death Uncovered

       Chris Cosgriff, the Chairman of the Officer Down Memorial Page, and the guys over at the ODMP recently uncovered a line of duty death that had previously been unreported.  The officer's name was Joseph Michalowski, and he was with the Middlesex County Sheriff's Department.  Officer Michalowski was shot and killed during a prisoner escape at the Middlesex County Jail.  There is a full write-up on the incident on the ODMP site.  Also, this site allows for people to leave memorial messages for our fallen brothers.  Since this one was just uncovered, there is only one as of this writing.  Please visit http://www.odmp.org/officer.php?oid=17047 and leave a message (or "reflection" as they call it) so this officer is not forgotten.  This is a non-profit site run by brilliant and dedicated people doing unbelievable work for our community.  The site accepts donations if you are interested.

 

 

Sunday, November 9, 2003

Website for JCPD Officer Domenick Infantes

We recently found a tribute website created for Jersey City Police Officer Domenick Infantes.  It contains information about Domenick and tells a little bit about his life.  It also has a guestbook which is open for all to sign.  Whoever created it did a very nice job.  Click here to visit the website.  

 

 

Friday, November 7, 2003

AG Launches Website for NJ LEO's

The Office of the Attorney General of New Jersey has created a website for New Jersey law enforcement officers.  It is a direct link from the AG's office to the line officer.  It is called Police Resources, and its contents range from newly enacted laws to information on radar certification.   For you firearms instructors, State Range Master John H. Zamrok has a page on the site where he keeps you abreast on the latest developments and updates.  To visit the site, click here.

 

 

Thursday, October 30, 2003

New FOP Website

The New Jersey Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) has updated their website.  The new format is more organized and easier to surf.  To take a look, click here.

 

 

Sunday, October 26, 2003

Amber Alert Page

The Amber Alert program is known to all by now.  It is responsible for the recovery of more than one hundred children as of this date.  We found a website that tracks all Amber Alerts in the US and Canada.  Click here to visit the site.

 

 

Tuesday, October 7, 2003

Title 39 Point Schedule

The website for New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission contains a lot of great information for the public and officers alike.  Citizens may now even conduct business over the website including the renewal of vehicle registrations and paying of motor vehicle summonses.  They even have a page listing the point schedule for various motor vehicle offenses.  Click here to visit their website.

 

 

Wednesday, October 1, 2003

Great Page on Pending Laws

The New Jersey FOP website has a page that lists all pending legislation that affects NJ law enforcement.  They call it "Legislative Watch."  It breaks each of the proposals down into a paragraph and provides the bill number for those who may want to visit the state website for additional information.  They even list their opinion of the legislation.  Each paragraph ends with "FOP supports" or "FOP opposes."  It is a great resource.  Click here to visit the page.  

 

 

 

Sunday, August 24, 2003

2002 Top 10 Stolen Cars 

For those of you who like running MDT checks in the parking lots of no-tell motels at 3:30 a.m., this list is for you.  Below are the top ten stolen cars for 2002.  This list is adjusted for the number of vehicles on the road.  An article on this can be found on www.money.cnn.com.  

 

Cadillac Escalade 4WD                  Dodge Stratus

Mitsubishi Mirage                           Jeep Wrangler 4WD

Lincoln Navigator 2WD                    Dodge Intrepid

Lincoln Navigator 4WD                    Dodge Ram 1500

Ford Expedition 2WD                      Chrysler Sebring

 

 

Tuesday, August 18, 2003

Credentials Fines Skyrocket

For those of you whose agencies are a little slow bringing you up to date with new and updated laws, effective August 15, 2003 the fines for 39:3-29 (failure to exhibit license, insurance or registration) have taken a little jump.  They have been increased from $44. to $150.00, and if paid in court, $173.00.  Interestingly, almost every officer in our LEO forum strongly opposes this jump calling it excessive.  To see the actual statute, click here.

 

 

Friday, August 12, 2003

Overtime Gone?

Big, big doings here.  There is a Federal proposal afoot that could drastically affect law enforcement and the ability to collect overtime.   Under current labor laws overtime must be paid to any and all officers who work in excess of 40 hours per week.  This new provision, if adopted, would exempt many of us from this rule.  It is unclear if the wording of your agency's collective bargaining agreement would protect you either.  At your next union meeting you need to discuss this and then run it by your local's attorney.  Don't just blow this off.  It is quite possible that it will make it through.  Protect yourself now.  American Police Beat put together an excellent article on this issue, so rather than re-invent the wheel, click here to see their article.  

 

 

Friday, August 8, 2003

Police/Fire Mortgage Rate to Increase

The current interest rate for the Police and Fire Mortgage Plan is 5.01%.  Effective August 15th, it goes up almost a half point to 5.40%.  From the PBA website you can access several mortgage companies which offer the plan.  Previously, we have recommended Sharon Press from North American Mortgage.  She is extremely knowledgeable and, just as important, extremely pleasurable to deal with.  Trust us, you'll agree after about thirty seconds on the telephone with her.  NJLawman.com has absolutely no affiliation with them either.  We randomly called her last year to get some information.  She can be contacted at 1-800-624-0421, extension #289. Otherwise, you can call one of the other companies listed.  

 

 

Sunday, August 3, 2003

70% at 25 Years, 75% at 30 Years

Major confusion on this whole issue and whether it benefits us.  On the message boards we've seen both complaints and praise.  Our view is that the worst case scenario is that we are closer to our ultimate goal then we have ever been.  The best case scenario is that we've finally done it, and guys and girls will soon be able to take advantage of this.  

 

The New Jersey State PBA did a good job on their website clearing up some of the questions and explaining this provision as well as an early retirement incentive that also went through.  The FOP was strongly involved in this issue as well, so we don't want to appear that we are touting one over the other.  The link to the PBA website follows, but this will only take you to the main page.  Go about half way down the page and look on the left side for the text listed below which will link you to the appropriate pages:  PBA Website

 

Assembly Bill A3703 - 70/75 Retirement Benefits

Assembly Bill 3530 - Early Retirement Incentive

 

 

Thursday, July 24, 2003

New Jersey Amber Alert Website

The New Jersey State Police unveiled their new Amber Alert Website.  The site is actually a page off of their own site.  It is aimed at helping law enforcement here in New Jersey recover a missing child quickly and safely. The new Web site allows viewers to see a photo of a missing child.

 

 

Thursday, July 3, 2003

Fireworks - What to charge...

       With July 4th quickly approaching, the annual question regarding fireworks also approaches: Hey Sarge, what do I charge them with?

 

       Chapter 21 covers explosives and fireworks.  You'll find a plethora of statutes in this chapter covering everything from smoking in a facility that manufacturers fireworks to rules regulating the public display of fireworks. The statute most relevant to the line officer will be 21:3-2. Sale, Possession, or Use of, Fireworks.

 

       "It shall be unlawful for any person to offer for sale, expose for sale, sell, possess or use, or explode any blank cartridge, toy pistol, toy cannon, toy cane or toy gun in which explosives are used; the type of balloon which requires fire underneath to propel the same; firecrackers; torpedoes;  skyrockets, Roman candles, bombs, sparklers or other fireworks of like construction, or any fireworks containing any explosive or inflammable compound or any tablets or other device commonly used and sold as fireworks containing nitrates, chlorates, oxalates, sulphides of lead, barium, antimony, arsenic, mercury, nitroglycerine, phosphorus or any compound containing any of the same or other explosives, or any substance or combination of substances, or article prepared for the purpose of producing a visible or an audible effect by combustion, explosion, deflagration or detonation, other than aviation and railroad signal light flares, except (a) that it shall be lawful for any person to offer for sale, expose for sale, sell, possess or use, or explode any toy pistol, toy cane, toy gun, or other device in which paper or plastic caps containing .25 grain or less of explosive compound per cap are used, providing they are so constructed that the hand cannot come in contact with the cap when in place for use, and toy pistol paper or plastic caps which contain less than .20 grain of explosive mixture per cap and (b) as in this chapter further provided. 

 

       The statute also contains exceptions and other important information, so be sure to read the actual law and consult your only agencies rules before filing any charges.  

 

 

Friday, June 20, 2003

Iraq Wants You

       In the mood for some serious adventure?  How about a one-year term of service in Baghdad as a police officer.  

 

      We received an email from a company called International Police Programs (IPM) which has been contracted by the US Department of Defense to recruit up to 1000 police officers of all ranks to help the Iraqi citizens organize effective civilian law enforcement, judicial, and correctional agencies.  The minimum term of service is one year, and officers would be armed and working in plain clothes positions.  The pay structure is as follows:

 

Senior Police Advisors and Section Chiefs:       $153,600.00

Judicial Officers:                                             $104,000.00

All Other Positions:                                        $75,076.92

 

       There are also available positions in East Timor and Kosovo.  Click here to visit their website.  

 

 

Saturday, June 14, 2003

Calibre Press - The Website

       Calibre Press, the Texas based company, is primarily known for the Street Survival seminars they give around the nation including the one that many of us have attended in Atlantic City.  Calibre Press also has a website which contains many articles, a nationwide law enforcement message board, resources, and an online catalog of their products.  Most of the site is limited to law enforcement only.  Click here to visit the Calibre Press Website.  

 

 

Monday, June 9, 2003

DOP Tightens Makeups

       In the latest promotional exam orientation guide, which was for municipal police sergeant, a change can be seen in the criteria for taking a makeup promotional exam.  Listed first are the new criteria.  Listed second are the old criteria.  

 

New Criteria

1. Debilitating injury or illness requiring an extended convalescent period, provided the candidate submits a doctor’s certification containing a diagnosis and a statement clearly showing that the candidate’s physical condition precluded his/her participation in the examination;

2. Death in the candidate’s immediate family as evidenced by a copy of the death certificate;

3. A candidate’s wedding that cannot be reasonably changed as evidenced by relevant documentation. (Wedding plans that are made after the publication of this

Orientation Guide will not be considered valid for this examination.)

4. Error by the DOP or Appointing Authority.

 

Old Criteria

1. Error by the Department of Personnel or Appointing Authority;

2. Serious illness or disability of the candidate on the examination date, provided the candidate submits a doctor’s certificate specifying that the candidate was not able to take the examination on that day for medical reasons;

3. Documented serious illness or death in the candidate’s immediate family;

4. Natural disaster;

5. Prior vacation or travel plans outside of New Jersey or any contiguous state, which cannot be reasonably changed, as evidenced by a sworn statement and relevant documentation; and

6. Other valid reasons.

 

 

 

 

 

Monday, April 14, 2003

Reinstituted Statute

       This one was sent in by one of our readers.  As you may recall, there was once a statute for allowing another who is unlicensed to operate a motor vehicle.  It had been repealed but is now back on the books.  You can read the entire statute below:

 

39:3-37.1  Unlawful loan of license, vehicle; penalty.

121. a. A person who has been issued a driver's license shall not lend that driver's license for use by another person.

b. A person who owns, leases or otherwise has control or custody of a motor vehicle registered under the provisions of this title shall not allow that motor vehicle to be operated by an unlicensed driver.

c. The penalty for a violation of this section shall be a fine of not less than $200 or more than $500, imprisonment for not more than 15 days, or both. L.2003,c.13,s.121

 

Friday, April 10, 2003

Mini-Police Helicopters

       If you follow the "Around the State" section of our main page, you may have seen an article on how the Atlantic City Police Department is considering the purchase of two  "Gyrocopters."  As pictured to the right, a Gyrocopter is a mini-helicopter.  With a maximum airspeed of about 100 mph, a maximum range of 250 miles, a ceiling of 10,000 feet, the Gyrocopter is marketed more as a toy than a police vehicle.  Nonetheless, just because it is not a common law enforcement vehicle, it doesn't mean that it couldn't be the wave of the future.  It is a little funny looking, though.  

 

Sunday, April 5, 2003

Racial Profiling Law

       Enacted last month, the "Racial Profiling Law" is now on the books.  Below is the actual statute.  There are attached related statutes not shown which contain definitions and the like.  Below is a link to see the actual and complete statute:

 

2C:30-6. Crime of official deprivation of civil rights

2. a. A public servant acting or purporting to act in an official capacity commits the crime of official deprivation of civil rights if, knowing that his conduct is unlawful, and acting with the purpose to intimidate or discriminate against an individual or group of individuals because of race, color, religion, gender, handicap, sexual orientation or ethnicity, the public servant: (1) subjects another to unlawful arrest or detention, including, but not limited to, motor vehicle investigative stops, search, seizure, dispossession, assessment, lien or other infringement of personal or property rights; or (2) denies or impedes another in the lawful exercise or enjoyment of any right, privilege, power or immunity.

 

b. (1) Except as provided in paragraphs (2) and (3) of this subsection, a public servant who violates the provisions of subsection a. of this section is guilty of a crime of the third degree.

 

(2)If bodily injury results from depriving a person of a right or privilege in violation of subsection a. of this section, the public servant is guilty of a crime of the second degree.

 

(3)If, during the course of violating the provisions of this section, a public servant commits or attempts or conspires to commit murder, manslaughter, kidnapping or aggravated sexual assault against a person who is being deprived of a right or privilege in violation of subsection a. of this section, the public servant is guilty of a crime of the first degree.

 

c. Notwithstanding the provisions of N.J.S.2C:1-8 or any other law, a conviction of official deprivation of civil rights under this section shall not merge with a conviction of any other criminal offense, nor shall such other conviction merge with a conviction under this section, and the court shall impose separate sentences upon each violation of this section and any other criminal offense.

 

d. Proof that a public servant made a false statement, prepared a false report, or, if the agency that employs the public servant, the Attorney General or the county prosecutor having supervisory authority over the agency required a report to be prepared, failed to prepare a report concerning the conduct that is the subject of the prosecution, shall give rise to an inference that the actor knew his conduct was unlawful.

 

e. For purposes of this section, an act is unlawful if it violates the Constitution of the United States or the Constitution of this State, or if it constitutes a criminal offense under the laws of this State.

 

       Click here to see the entire statute.

 

 

Friday, March 21, 2003

Anti-Cop Website

       One of our readers gave us this one.   There is a website that conducts investigations of area law enforcement officers.   While their exact mission is somewhat unclear,  they seem to have a strong disdain for law enforcement.  A quick scan of the site suggests that they are another anti-police misconduct site which is fine.  There are hundreds of those on the web.  However, a more detailed look shows that they gather personal information of officers including name, address, home phone number, email address and post same on their site or link to such information on a different site.  They also post pictures of undercover law officers.  They primarily target NYPD, but some New Jersey agencies and officers have also been depicted.  While we do not normally post links to anti-law enforcement sites, you might want to take a look at this one and make sure that you are not featured.  Click here to take a look.

 

 

Thursday, March 20, 2003

New PBA Local for Retired Members

       The New Jersey State PBA formed a new local several months back that is for retired PBA members.  It will be the Local #600.  Depending on interest, it could grow to be the largest local in the state.  Any member of a local who retires in good standing is eligible for membership in Local #600.  The membership cost is $35.00 per year paid by the individual member to PBA Local #600

 

       For further information on this new local, you may visit the NJ PBA Website.

 

Tuesday, March 18, 2003

Terrorist Threat Level Raised

       On Tuesday, March 17, 2003 the Terrorist Threat Level was raised from Elevated to High.  This decision was made by the Office of Homeland Security.

 

 

Thursday, February 27, 2003

Terrorist Threat Level Raised

       On Thursday, February 27, 2003 the Terrorist Threat Level was lowered from High to Elevated.  This decisions was made by the Office of Homeland Security.

 

Saturday, February 16, 2003

Inmate Search - A Most Excellent Resource

       This one was sent to us by Det. Mike George of the Freehold Borough Police Department in Monmouth County.  

 

       The website for the NJ Department of Corrections now has a feature where you can search through an online database for inmates who are incarcerated in New Jersey state prisons.  You can get all of their information including photos.  You can even get information on some released inmates.  The offender locator has approximately 97,000 offender records, including offenders who are currently housed in Department of Corrections facilities as well as those who have been paroled or released from an NJDOC prison.  Click here to take a look.  On their home page click "offender search" on the left toolbar.  

 

Monday, February 10, 2003

New Attorney General Guideline

       On Monday, February 10, 2003 the New Jersey Attorney General issued a new Attorney General Guideline.  It is named "Attorney General Guidelines for Deciding Whether to Apply for a Waiver of Forfeiture of Public Office Pursuant to N.J.S.A. 2C:51-2e."  

 

       The law regarding forfeiture of public office may be found in N.J.S.A. 2C:51.2.  The first paragraph of this law reads as follows:

 

2C:51-2.Forfeiture of public office

2C:51-2. Forfeiture of Public Office. a. A person holding any public office, position, or employment, elective or appointive, under the government of this State or any agency or political subdivision thereof, who is convicted of an offense shall forfeit such office or position if:

(1) He is convicted under the laws of this State of an offense involving dishonesty or of a crime of the third degree or above or under the laws of another state or of the United States of an offense or a crime which, if committed in this State, would be such an offense or crime;

(2) He is convicted of an offense involving or touching such office, position or employment; or

(3) The Constitution or a statute other than the code so provides.

 

       There are several more paragraphs in this law with exceptions, penalties, etc.  Also contained in this law are criteria for waiving the forfeiture of office provision.  "Any forfeiture or disqualification under subsection a., b. or d. which is based upon a conviction of a disorderly persons or petty disorderly persons offense may be waived by the court upon application of the county prosecutor or the Attorney General and for good cause shown."

 

       This new Attorney General Guideline seeks to harmonize throughout the state the application of this law and the waiver.  Standards were created for cases where the the application of the forfeiture law is discretionary.  They stemmed from a New Jersey Supreme Court Court Case, James Flagg v. Essex County Prosecutor, 171 N.J. 561 (2002).  

 

       The actual Guideline is too lengthy to list here, but you may use any of the blue hyperlinks above to visit the actual Guideline, the NJ statute, or the Supreme Court case.  

 

Wednesday, February 5, 2003

Ricin

       Last month British Police discovered Ricin in a North London Apartment.  They made four arrests and believe that there are links to al-Qaeda.  Ricin is an extremely dangerous substance that usually can be found in a white powdery form.  

 

       Ricin was a concern once before back in the 1990's.  In fact, DEA had dispatched an alert to all US Law Enforcement.  In that case, it was suspected that drug traffickers were mixing Ricin with cocaine.  Since this dangerous weapon has resurfaced, officers should be familiar with it.  Following is a portion of that original alert describing Ricin.  Again, this is not a current alert.  It is the text from an old one, but it explains Ricin well.  

 

       This alert advises that nationwide trend among drug traffickers is to "bait" law enforcement officers with a white powder called RICIN. RICIN is a derivative of Castor beans and looks like powder methamphetamine. It is highly toxic and if it contacts human skin, it is fatal. The death process takes several days, depending upon the dosage, and is almost impossible to detect during an autopsy.

       Forensic experts advise that if you field test RICIN in the Scott Reagent Kit, it will foam and bubble extensively. The test will also produce a gas that is very similar to mustard gas and can also be lethal if inhaled. RICIN is 6,000 times more lethal than cyanide and there is no antidote. Symptoms of contact exposure to RICIN are: Fever, cough, weakness, and hypothermia, progressing to dangerously low blood pressure, heart failure and death.

       Due to this situation, in the event of suspect drug seizures, do not come into direct skin contact with any powdered substances, and exhibit caution of field testing any powdered substances.

Monday, January 28, 2003

The Legal Protection Plan Today

       The Legal Protection Plan was established in 1993.  This program provides you protection for legal costs for annual premium of $132. The coverage administrative proceedings is $15,000 per policy period. Coverage under the administrative clause is for any departmental charges or disciplinary action both on or off duty. All criminal and or / civil actions have $30,000 coverage and is for in the line of duty only. You are also provided with $2,500 coverage for target of a criminal investigation.  Click here for an updated list of attorneys participating in the plan.  Click here to go to the State PBA site for additional information.  

 

Saturday, January 17, 2003

New Statute

       In December the State Legislature passed a bill which prohibits school bus drivers from using cell phones.  Take a look...

 

C.39:3B-25 Use of cell phone prohibited while driving school bus, exception; fines.

1. a. It shall be unlawful for the driver of a school bus, as defined in R.S.39:1-1, to use a cellular or other wireless telephone while operating the school bus.

b. The prohibition contained in subsection a. of this section shall not apply:

(1) when the school bus is parked in a safe area off of a highway; or

(2) in an emergency situation.

c. A person who violates this section shall be fined not less than $250 or more than $500.

d. No motor vehicle points or automobile insurance eligibility points pursuant to section 26 of P.L.1990, c.8 (C.17:33B-14) shall be assessed for this offense

 

2. This act shall take effect immediately.  Approved December 12, 2002.

 

 

 

Thursday, December 6, 2002

New Statute - Special Attention to Narcotic Strike Force Officers

       Great new statute especially for officers who do a lot of narcotics work and search warrant executions!  Take a look:

 

4:19-38 Debarking silencing of dog, certain circumstances; third degree crime.

1.  A person who surgically debarks or silences a dog, or causes the surgical debarking or silencing of a dog, for reasons other than to protect the life or health of the dog as deemed necessary by a duly licensed veterinarian shall be guilty of a crime of the third degree.

 

       As you see, the statute is under Title 4 of the New Jersey Code.  There are other provisions added as well.  Click here to view the code.

 

Monday, December 2, 2002

New Statute

       A statute prohibiting the feeding of black bears went into effect recently.  While it will probably never be used in Camden, Atlantic City, or Egg Harbor, it might be useful to those in the northern part of the state.  Take a look...

 

23:2A-14.  Intentional feeding of black bears prohibited; violations, penalties

1.  a.  No person shall:

 

  (1)feed, give, place, expose, deposit, distribute or scatter any edible material or attractant with the intention of feeding, attracting or enticing a black bear; or

  (2)store pet food, garbage or other bear attractants in a manner that will result in bear feedings when black bear are known to frequent the area.

 

See the actual statute for penalties, exceptions and definitions.  It is enforceable by municipal and state officers.  

 

Wednesday, November 6, 2002

Interesting Reading

       We don't normally do this, but there is a hilarious message board based off the website copwatch.com.  It is filled with postings from every anti-police crusader, and it sounds like the propaganda machine from the old Soviet Union.  If you want to drive them bananas, leave a post telling them you're on the job and what you think of their conspiracy theories.  Try and be somewhat  nice.   Click here to take a peek.  A word of caution though.  Don't go if you easily get offended.  They really dislike law enforcement.   

 

 

Wednesday, October 23, 2002

New Statute

       An addition to the Simple Assault statute went into effect on August 3rd of this year.  This "Youth Sporting Event" addition is worded as follows:

 

f.    A person who commits a simple assault as [] in the presence of a child under 16 years of age at a school or community sponsored youth sports event is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree. The defendant shall be strictly liable upon proof that the offense occurred, in fact, in the presence of a child under 16 years of age. It shall not be a defense that the defendant did not know that the child was present or reasonably believed that the child was 16 years of age or older. []  As used in this act, "school or community sponsored youth sports event" means a competition, practice or instructional event involving one or more interscholastic sports teams or youth sports teams organized pursuant to a nonprofit or similar charter or which are member teams in a youth league organized by or affiliated with a county or municipal recreation department and shall not include collegiate, semi-professional or professional sporting events.

 

Monday, October 21, 2002

Legislation Prohibiting MV Stops with Unmarked Cars

       In January of this year a bill was put before the New Jersey Legislature prohibiting law enforcement officers from effecting motor vehicle stops with unmarked cars.  THIS IS NOT YET A LAW.  The text of the bill reads as follows:

 

"1.  a.  An unmarked vehicle shall not be used by the State Police or a county or municipal police department for the routine stopping or apprehension of motorists for violations of the motor vehicle laws. However, unmarked police vehicles may be used to stop or apprehend motorists under circumstances presenting a substantial threat to the public safety or for other purposes authorized by law or regulation.

    b. "Unmarked vehicle ,"as used in this act, means a motor vehicle operated by the State Police or a county or municipal police agency which lacks the standard colors, insignia and other markings of standard patrol vehicles."

 

       Again, this is just a bill, and it is still in committee.  It is not yet New Jersey Law.  This bill was sponsored by Assembly Woman Nilsa Cruz-Perez

 

Friday, October 18, 2002

Best Kept Secret in NJ

       We did an article on this topic several months back, but in light of just having returned from attending a school there, we have more.  Attention all chiefs, training officers, and anyone who has anything to do with assigning officers to schools!!!  There is a facility in Pennsylvania called the Northeast Counterdrug Training Center located in Fort Indiantown Gap.  Attending law enforcement schools at this facility is 100% free.  Plus, they supply all books and materials,  all lodging, and all meals.  It really is the best kept secret, because very few agencies know about it, and even fewer utilize it.

 

       Many of their schools are several days long, so lodging is provided.  They give each person their own private room with their own bathroom, desk and work area, telephone, and cable equipped television complete with LETN..  There are activities on the base including a gym for after hours.  All law enforcement officers have access to the Officer's Club, the PX, and many of the other base offerings.  NCTC offers an extensive amount of training on everything from grant writing to search warrant execution to basic and advanced Spanish.   This school is an excellent way to get your officers state-of-the-art training as well as rewarding officers for accomplishments especially for those agencies with limited or non-existent training budgets.    Most officers immensely enjoy going to schools, and this one is one of the finest.   Click here to visit their website.

 

Wednesday, October 9, 2002

Proposed Change for Disposing of Found Property by Police Departments

       Right now there is a bill in committee which will could substantially aid officers who are responsible for the evidence and property for their departments.  If made a law, it will drop the retention period of found property to 30 days from 6 months.  It will also allow for easy disposal methods one of which being the donating of useful items to nonprofit organizations.  The bill is A 2781.  It was actually the idea of Detective Sergeant Ray Davis of the Egg Harbor Township Police Department who came up with the proposal and submitted it to local legislators.   At this point letters need to be written in support of the bill.  They should be mailed to the Chairman of the Assembly Law and Public Safety Committee, Peter Barnes,1967 Route 27, Suite 20 Edison, NJ 08817 or sent to his email address.  DSG Davis can be contacted at RDavis@ehtpd.com.    (With all the complaining we do about the laws, this officer should be commended for actually trying to do something about them.  Nice job.)

 

Sunday, October 6, 2002

Salaries of NJ Judges

       Ever wonder how much those guys wearing the robe make?  Below is a peek at the annual salaries of our New Jersey State Judges:

  • Chief Justice of the Supreme Ces of our New Jersey State Judges:

    • Chief Justice of the Supreme Court $164,250

    • Associate Justice of the Supreme Court $158,500

    • Judge of the Superior Court,  Appellate Division $150,000

    • Judge of the Superior Court,  Assignment Judge $146,750

    • Judge of the Superior Court;  Judge of the Tax Court $141,000

     

     

    Monday, September 16, 2002

    Keeping your Calm on Test Day

           In many NJDOP agencies there will be an abundance of sergeants and administrators working the afternoon shift tomorrow.  No, there is no strike or flu.  There is a sergeant's exam.

     

           It's a very stressful day for most.  So much of your life over the past several months has been devoted to this day.  So much sacrifice, so many missed outings and events all for a few hours in some high school or other similar facility.  Here's some of what you've missed:

    • The entire summer

    • The Yankees are ten games ahead in first place.  (Tampa Bay has only won   49 games this year at 49 and 100)

    • Football season has begun

    • The PBA and FOP are still feuding

    • It looks like we'll be paying Saddam Hussein a visit

    • Janet Reno won't be the Governor of Florida

    • You've probably lost more money in the stock market

           The good news is that it will soon all be over.  There's not much more you can do.  The enemy is no longer lack of preparation.  The enemy now is anxiety.  Get a good night sleep, have a hearty breakfast, take a little nappy if you need one, and try and relax.  When you get to the site clown around with your buddies, or don't.  Simply, do whatever it is that keeps you relaxed.  Once in the room, take some deep breaths, and take it slow.  Manage your time, but read the questions slowly.  Rushing will hurt you more than not having enough time.  When it's over, it will all be over.  You will have so much extra time on your hands that you won't know what to do with it.   You will soon have your life back.  Good luck.

     

    Thursday, September 5, 2002

    When Simple Assault Becomes Aggravated Assault

           Under the New Jersey statute for Simple Assault, there are seven (7) instances where a simple assault becomes an aggravated assault solely because of the status or position of the victim of the assault.  Below is a review of those situations as of this date:

     

    (a)  Any law enforcement officer acting in the performance of his duties while in uniform or exhibiting evidence of his authority or because of his status as a law enforcement officer; or

    (b) Any paid or volunteer fireman acting in the performance of his duties while in uniform or otherwise clearly identifiable as being engaged in the performance of the duties of a fireman; or

    (c) Any person engaged in emergency first-aid or medical services acting in the performance of his duties while in uniform or otherwise clearly identifiable as being engaged in the performance of emergency first-aid or medical services; or

    (d) Any school board member, school administrator, teacher, school bus driver or other employee of a school board while clearly identifiable as being engaged in the performance of his duties or because of his status as a member or employee of a school board or any school bus driver employed by an operator under contract to a school board while clearly identifiable as being engaged in the performance of his duties or because of his status as a school bus driver; or

    (e) Any employee of the Division of Youth and Family Services while clearly identifiable as being engaged in the performance of his duties or because of his status as an employee of the division; or

    (f) Any justice of the Supreme Court, judge of the Superior Court, judge of the Tax Court or municipal judge while clearly identifiable as being engaged in the performance of judicial duties or because of his status as a member of the judiciary; or

    (g) Any operator of a motorbus or the operator's supervisor or any employee of a rail passenger service while clearly identifiable as being engaged in the performance of his duties or because of his status as an operator of a motorbus or as the operator's supervisor or as an employee of a rail passenger service.

     

     

    Friday, August 9, 2002

    Contracts and Collective Bargaining Agreements

           For many agencies contract time is approaching.  Below is some information that might be useful for those preparing for negotiations:

     

    Average % Increase

    2000

    2001

    2002

    2003

    2004

    4.23%

    3.89%

    4.10%

    4.05%

    4.46%

    Average Base Salary without Longevity

    2000

    2001

    2002

    2003

    2004

    $59,125

    $62,011

    $65,278

    $70,064

    $76,490

     

           The source of this information was the Summer, 2002 PBA Newsletter, and these figures are based only on the information reported to the State PBA from the individual locals.  

     

     

    Wednesday, July 31, 2002

    Line of Duty Death Summary

           As of Wednesday, July 31, 2002, 67 law enforcement officers have lost their lives in the line of duty.  While depressing and not a favorite topic, it's something that every officer should keep in his or her mind.  

     

    Statistics for 2002

     

            Aircraft accident: 5                        Assault: 2
            Automobile accident: 17             Drowned: 2
            Gunfire: 25                                   Gunfire (Accidental): 2
            Heart attack: 1                             Motorcycle accident: 2
            Stabbed: 1                                   Struck by train: 1
            Struck by vehicle: 1                      Training accident: 1
            Vehicular assault: 4                      Vehicle pursuit: 3

            Average age: 38 years old      Gender breakdown:  Female: 6  Male: 61

     

    S

     

    Wednesday, July 10, 2002

    An Online Port Authority Tribute worth checking out

           Officer James Miller of the Middlesex County Department of Corrections put together a very touching online tribute to Port Authority Police Officer Chris Amoroso who died in the line of duty on September 11th.  James is the Vice-President of the Middlesex Corrections PBA and is a self taught web designer.  When you check out the site be sure to have your sound on.  James chose a very moving bagpipe song for the background of his tribute page.  At the bottom of the page there is a link to the PBA 152 Website.  PBA 152 Online Tribute

     

    Sunday, July 7, 2002

    A Powerful and Often Overlooked Statute

           Okay, so you arrest this guy and find a knife, nun-chucks, or some other non-firearm type weapons on him.  Normally, you charge him (if you even bother) with the basic fourth degree Unlawful Possession of a Weapon statute, 2C:39-5, only to have it come back to municipal court a month later.  If he was also in violation of the Certain Persons Not to Have Weapons statute, 2C:39-7, and you charged him with that, it would have added a second fourth degree offense significantly increasing the chances of the case remaining in Superior Court.  

     

           Even better, if you arrested him for just the third degree offense of Unlawful Possession of a Firearm, and he was in violation of 2C:39-7, you would now be adding a second degree offense by charging him with Certain Persons Not to Have Weapons which comes with a presumption of incarceration.

     

           Basically, the "Certain Persons" prohibits certain persons from possessing weapons.  These certain persons are those who have been convicted of certain offenses on a previous occasion including but not limited to aggravated assault, arson, burglary, escape, extortion, homicide, kidnapping, robbery, aggravated sexual assault, sexual assault, bias intimidation.  There are other offenses and situations listed in the statute as well.  

     

           See 2C:39-7 for the actual law.

     

     

    Thursday, June 27, 2002

    Terrorism affects NJ Statutes

           The results of world terrorism have reached the 2C book.  In 2002 some amendments were made to some of our statutes.  Take a look.

     

    1.  Terroristic Threats  2C:12-3

         The previous statute is still in tact, but the following provision was added:

    "A violation of this subsection is a crime of the second degree if it occurs during a declared period of national, State or county emergency."  

     

    2.  Tampering, Damage Involving Nuclear Plant  2C:17-7  

         This statute was a third degree crime.  It is now a first degree crime.

     

    3.  False Public Alarms  2C:33-3

         Again, the initial statute is the same but the following text was added:

           "A person is guilty of a crime of the second degree if a violation of subsection a. of this section in fact results in serious bodily injury to another person or occurs during a declared period of national, State or county emergency.  A person is guilty of a crime of the first degree if a violation of subsection a. of this section in fact results in death."

     

    4.  September 11th, 2001 Anti-Terrorism Act.  2C:38-1 - 2C: 38-5

         This is a brand new chapter in the 2C code.  The statutes are as follows:

     

    2C:38-1       Short Title

    2C:38-2       Crimes of Terrorism, Definitions

    2C:38-3       Producing or Possessing Chemical Weapons, Biological

                        Agents or Nuclear or Radiological Devices; Definitions.

    2C:38-4       Hindering Apprehension or Prosecution for Terrorism

    2C:28-5       Soliciting or Providing Material Support or Resources

                        for Terrorism; Definitions.

     

           It is fair to say that more will probably come.  

     

    Tuesday, June 25, 2002

    New Technology

           The Marlboro Township Police Department in Monmouth County has recently picked up a pretty neat new gadget.  

     

           Let's say that Marlboro officers respond to a call of a lost child.  With the press of a button, an automated telephone system will be able to alert every homeowner and business owner within a 1 mile radius to look out their windows for the missing child.  The parameters could be changed and a 2 mile radius could be used, or just the homes and businesses north of the missing child's last location could be contacted.  This windows-based program is called the Communicator Emergency Notification System, and it is provided by Dialogic Communications based in Tennessee.  

     

           The complete system is estimated to cost about $47,500.  There will also be other fees incurred from the telephone company.

     

     

    Monday, June 17, 2002

    Fireworks - What to charge...

     

           With July 4th quickly approaching, the annual question regarding fireworks also approaches: Hey Sarge, what do I charge them with?

     

           Chapter 21 covers explosives and fireworks.  You'll find a plethora of statutes in this chapter covering everything from smoking in a facility that manufacturers fireworks to rules regulating the public display of fireworks. The statute most relevant to the line officer will be 21:3-2. Sale, Possession, or Use of, Fireworks.

     

           "It shall be unlawful for any person to offer for sale, expose for sale, sell, possess or use, or explode any blank cartridge, toy pistol, toy cannon, toy cane or toy gun in which explosives are used; the type of balloon which requires fire underneath to propel the same; firecrackers; torpedoes;  skyrockets, Roman candles, bombs, sparklers or other fireworks of like construction, or any fireworks containing any explosive or inflammable compound or any tablets or other device commonly used and sold as fireworks containing nitrates, chlorates, oxalates, sulphides of lead, barium, antimony, arsenic, mercury, nitroglycerine, phosphorus or any compound containing any of the same or other explosives, or any substance or combination of substances, or article prepared for the purpose of producing a visible or an audible effect by combustion, explosion, deflagration or detonation, other than aviation and railroad signal light flares, except (a) that it shall be lawful for any person to offer for sale, expose for sale, sell, possess or use, or explode any toy pistol, toy cane, toy gun, or other device in which paper or plastic caps containing .25 grain or less of explosive compound per cap are used, providing they are so constructed that the hand cannot come in contact with the cap when in place for use, and toy pistol paper or plastic caps which contain less than .20 grain of explosive mixture per cap and (b) as in this chapter further provided. 

           The statute also contains exceptions and other important information, so be sure to read the actual law and consult your only agencies rules before filing any charges.  

     

    Monday,  June 3, 2002

    New statute

    This statute was added late last year.

    2C:40-21. Tattooing of a minor; parental permission, required 
    1.  A person commits a disorderly persons offense if he knowingly tattoos or engages in body piercing of a minor under the age of 18 years without first having obtained the written permission of the minor's parent or legal guardian or, if neither exists, a person who stands in place of a parent. L.2001,c.190.

     

    Wednesday, May 22, 2002

    Homeland Security Advisory System

           As a result of the events of last September, the US Government several months ago implemented a Homeland Security Advisory System.  Below is the actual alert as shown on the Homeland Security Website.

     

           Currently, we are at Condition Yellow, the Elevated Condition.

     

    Thursday, May 16, 2002

    New Statute

           This new provision was added to the Tampering with Public Records statute late last year.  Interesting.

     

    2C:28-7. Tampering with public records or information 

    c. A person commits a crime of the fourth degree if he purposely and unlawfully alters, destroys, conceals, removes or disables any camera or other monitoring device including any videotape, film or other medium used to record sound or images that is installed in a patrol vehicle. Amended 2001, c.219.

     

     

    Tuesday, May 7, 2002

    Strip Searches vs. Body Cavity Searches

           It is crucial that all New Jersey officers are familiar with the line that separates a search from a strip search or a body cavity search.  Following are the definitions of "Strip Search" and "Body Cavity Search" as listed in the Attorney General's Strip Search and Body Cavity Search Requirements and Procedures for Police Officers:

    1. Strip Search

      1. Removal or rearrangement of clothing to permit visual inspection of a person's

        1. undergarments; 2. buttocks; 3. anus; 4. genitals; 5. breasts

      2. The following does not constitute a strip search:

        1. removal or rearranging of clothing reasonably required to render medical treatment or assistance, or

        2. removal of articles of outer clothing, such as coats, ties, belts or shoelaces.

         

    2. Body Cavity Search

      1. Visual inspection or manual search of a person's

        1. anal cavity;  2.   vaginal cavity

     

    Thursday, May 2, 2002

    New 2C Statute

         In 2001 a new statute for Bias Intimidation (2C:16-1)  was created by the New Jersey Legislature. At the same time, certain portions of the Harassment (2C:33-4) statute were deleted.  The new statute will cover everything formerly covered by the Harassment statute and more.

     

    2C:16-1. Bias intimidation.

    • Bias Intimidation. A person is guilty of the crime of bias intimidation if he commits, attempts to commit, conspires with another to commit, or threatens the immediate commission of an offense specified in chapters 11 through 18 of Title 2C of the New Jersey Statutes; N.J.S.2C:33-4; N.J.S.2C:39-3; N.J.S.2C:39-4 or N.J.S.2C:39-5,
      (See the actual statute for additional included information)

     

 

 

 

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